Huskies Battle Monarchs, But Battle Battles Back

By Catherine Morrison

On a windy and cold Friday afternoon, Northeastern (2–3) faced Old Dominion (7–2) in Norfolk, Virginia in the first in a three-game series. Northeastern was coming off an 11–2 drubbing of UMass on Wednesday, but was in for a different affair on Friday, when a rollercoaster of emotions ended in a walk-off home run by the Monarchs’ Kyle Battle.

Northeastern started with a leadoff single by Scott Holzwasser, who extended his on-base streak to 23 games. The next three batters were quickly taken care of, leaving Holzwasser stranded. The Huskies wouldn’t get another chance to score until the fourth inning.

Kyle Murphy, the Huskies’ season opener, battled wind conditions and didn’t have the command he needed. The Monarchs capitalized with a two-run homer by Carter Trice. Old Dominion stranded a couple of baserunners but ended the inning up 2–0.

Murphy settled in at the top of the second and pitched a 1-2-3 inning. He was plagued again by the wind in the bottom of the third, however, as he walked Trice and gave up a run-scoring double to Andy Garriola. After walking three in a scoreless fourth inning to bring his pitch count to 88, Murphy was replaced by stalwart middle reliever David Stiehl.

“Conditions were a little sneaky tough today; it was windy and blowing hard to right and it was a little bit cool,” Northeastern head coach Mike Glavine said. “It was tough to get a grip on the ball and so the command Kyle had wasn’t what he wanted it to be . . .  But overall Kyle settled in; I think he gave us quality innings there.”

After three slow innings, Northeastern’s lineup finally got something started when Jared Dupere singled and advanced to second on an error. Corey DiLoreto followed with a roaring single up the middle to plate him. At this point, Monarch hurler Hunter Gregory was clearly feeling the heat, and walked Max Viera to put runners on first and second. Jeff Castello sent DiLoreto home with a single but was stranded on base.

“Corey made some big plays there and [on] defense he’s a big target back there; he’s long and he’s good to throw to,” Glavine said. “I think it gives them a comfortness to let the ball fly and know he’s gonna cover a lot of ground. He made . . . a diving catch, a couple of leaping catches so the ball found him today . . . He’s swinging the bat well and he’s off to a heck of a start for us.”

Northeastern tacked on six runs across the sixth and eighth innings, putting the score at 8–5 and a win within reach. But the Monarchs returned in the eighth inning with a vengeance. A couple of hits, a passed ball, and an RBI groundout set the table for Trice, who smacked his second home run of the ballgame to cut the Husky lead to one. Northeastern closer Brandon DuFault looked like he would make it out of the inning alive when he struck out Garriola, but caught an unlikely break when the third strike got past catcher Teddy Beaudet and Garriola stole first. 

“Obviously no one’s trying to make mistakes but we need to be able to play under pressure,” Glavine noted. “I feel like we just handed them those runs. I’ve seen our guys make those plays hundreds of times so we just gotta learn from it.”

Old Dominion took advantage of Garriola’s second chance and sent him home on a double by Robbie Petracci to tie the score at eight. DuFault finally escaped the inning by striking out Coutney. 

After Monarch closer Aaron Holiday retired the side in order in the top of the ninth, Dufault walked Brock Gagliardi to kick off the home half. He settled down and induced a groundout and a strikeout for two outs, but the Monarchs returned to the top of their lineup with the tension peaking: a runner on second, two out. Battle swung hard, connected with a satisfying crack, and sent the ball over the fence for a walk-off two-run homer. 

“That one hurt,” Glavine said. “We did so many things well and just not enough. We have to find a way early in the season to win these ballgames.”

Northeastern will be back at Bud Metheny Baseball Complex Saturday at 1 PM for the second of the three-game series.

Northeastern Routs UMass, 11–2

Photos by Sadie Parker

Story by Milton Posner

With their second double-digit scoring effort in as many days, Northeastern (2–2) notched an 11–2 win over UMass (0–1) Wednesday afternoon at Parsons Field.

The Huskies scored in five of the first six frames, including nine runs across the fourth, fifth, and sixth innings to put the game well out of reach. Ben Malgeri and Teddy Beaudet smacked three hits apiece, while Corey DiLoreto smack two doubles, walked twice, and scored four runs.

Freshman hurler Wyatt Scotti fanned five across four scoreless innings to earn the win in his debut. Though the Huskies ceded a run in each of the final frames, the relief trio of Matt Downing, Jake Gigliotti, and James Quinlivan had kept the Minutemen scoreless through the seventh, effectively sealing the game.

But the most absurd moment of the game came on the basepaths. And no, it wasn’t one of the Huskies 10 stolen bases on the day, the ones head coach Mike Glavine said would be key to their offense moving forward. No, it was this preposterous slide from Scott Holzwasser that topped the SportsCenter list at day’s end.

The Huskies will travel south for three games against Old Dominion on March 5, 6, and 7. The Monarchs are 6–2 and, like the Huskies, have scored 11 or more runs in half of their games.

Grand Slam Lifts Huskies to 14–11 Revenge Win over Wake Forest

By Sarah Olender

After a 9–0 loss last night, the Northeastern baseball team couldn’t be expected to be in high spirits. It couldn’t have been easy to return for a third game against the No. 17 Wake Forest team that dominated in every facet of the game.

Still, the Huskies started strong, with Scott Holzwasser and Ian Fair reaching base and freshman Max Viera driving Holzwasser in on a single. The Huskies kept their lead through the first, with redshirt freshman Cam Schlittler striking out two batters. 

“We finally won the first inning,” said Head Coach Mike Glavine. “We got in there and scored and shut them down, got off to a good start.”

Schlittler walked junior Shane Muntz, who was sent around the bases by a home run to center field from freshman Brock Wilken. The Huskies answered in the top of the third as Holzwasser and Ben Malgeri scored on Jared Dupere base knock. The bats stayed alive as Fair advanced Dupere on a single before a Corey DiLoreto sac fly cashed him in and made it 4–2 in Northeastern’s favor. Clean fielding and another Schlittler strikeout kept the Deacons scoreless in the bottom half.

To start the fourth, Wake Forest dug into their bullpen, bringing out Crawford Wade. A dropped third strike and a Wade overthrow to first put Northeastern’s Spenser Smith on third with two out, and though Wade fanned Holzwasser to end the threat, his pitch count did suffer for the experience. In the bottom of the fourth, Schlittler, still pitching a great game, started losing speed, and had to work himself out of trouble. 

Wake Forest reached into their bullpen again in the fifth, and hurler Reed Mascalo gave up a 436-foot bomb to Dupere on just his third pitch of the game. Northeastern opted to stay with their starter, and a barrage of Deacon hits put traffic on the bases and shrank the Husky lead to 5–3.

Midway through the sixth, as Northeastern began to connect on Mascalo’s pitches, Wake Forest brought in their fourth pitcher of the game, Camden Minacci, with a Northeastern runner on third. A fielder’s choice, an infield single, and a groundout combined to cash in two runs and increase the Husky lead to four.

In the bottom of the sixth, Northeastern finally pulled their starter, and redshirt sophomore Owen Langan took the mound. After a series of small hits and walks loaded the bases, Malgeri lost Pierce Bennett’s fly ball in the sun in right-center. The error closed the score to 7–6 in Northeastern’s favor.

In an effort to regain the momentum, Glavine called on redshirt freshman Thomas Balboni to change things up on the Deacons. Balboni immediately ceded a two-run single to Rémi Lanzoni that drove in two runs and gave the Deacons their first lead. Wake Forest kept smacking singles and loading the bases, eventually batting around and taking a 9–7 lead behind a six-run sixth inning.

But Northeastern didn’t give up. With two men in scoring position, Kyle Peterson drove a single to right field to re-tie the game. Northeastern loaded the bases again and Wake Forest brought Eric Adler to the mound to face Holzwasser in a jam. On a 3-1 count, Adler threw a perfect fastball and Holzwasser capitalized on the opportunity, driving the pitch out to left center. His grand slam brought the score to 13–9 in the Huskies’ favor.  

“A few of those runs defensively we could have hung our heads and felt sorry for ourselves, but we came out fighting,” Glavine siad. “I think that’s going to pay dividends and speak volumes as this season goes on. We come back after a tough inning and keep fighting . . . To give up six runs in an inning and come back and score six was just incredible to see.”

Wake Forest answered a Northeastern RBI sac fly in the top of the eighth with a Chris Lanzilli solo homer in the bottom half. Despite an 11th Wake Forest run in the bottom of the ninth, Brandon Dufault closed out the Deacons by forcing a groundout from Bobby Seymour with two on.

Save for the first three innings of Saturday’s game, the Huskies had a strong weekend against the No. 17 Demon Deacons. Despite losing two of three games in their opening series, they were competitive in most innings.

“This weekend it was a swing or pitch or play away from winning the series against a team like Wake,” Glavine said. “I’m just really proud of the guys this weekend.”

Northeastern Trampled by Wake Forest

By Jordan Baron and Sarah Olender

It was Northeastern baseball’s second game of the season, and anyone who watched yesterday’s matchup knows that Northeastern struggled in the first inning. That story didn’t change on Saturday, as the Huskies dropped their second game in a row, 9–0, to the No. 17 Wake Forest Demon Deacons in game two of a three-game road set. 

It was a tough start in the first three innings. Northeastern batters struck out, popped out, or grounded out, and the one man to make it to first, freshman Max Viera, got picked off a few pitches later.

“Overall we just gotta play better, be sharper, and offensively we showed signs but we didn’t hit well with runners in scoring position, but we got guys on, we put up some pretty good at bats,” Northeastern head coach Mike Glavine said. “We weren’t quite as sharp and crisp as we were last night.”

Wake Forest easily worked Husky starter Sebastian Keane into a high pitch count. Midway through the third inning, Keane reached his limit, having already thrown 79 pitches and given up six runs. Despite the depressing score, Keane had punched out four Demon Deacons.

“We’ve got to start winning the first inning and putting up zeros,” Glavine said. “So maybe it’s just changing a little bit how we prep pregame and being ready to go in that first inning, trying to get off to a better start because we definitely don’t want to be constantly playing from behind.”

Redshirt senior reliever David Stiehl took over the hill to try and close out the third inning. Stiehl also struggled to shut down the Deacons, allowing two more runs that were both charged to Keane before finally ending the scoring threat. Steihl settled in afterward and finished with an impressive line, allowing no earned runs and just one hit over 2.2 innings of work. The right-hander walked two and struck out three.

On the other side of things, Wake Forest junior starter William Fleming diced the Husky lineup, allowing just one hit through three innings with his fastball hitting the upper nineties.

Suddenly, the Huskies found life in the fourth, racking up three straight hits to load the bases with just one gone. But the right-handed Fleming kept his composure, and showcased the depth and strength of the Demon Deacon pitching staff as he fanned Corey DiLoreto looking and got Jeff Costello to pop to second to end the frame.

Fleming continued his rampage against the Northeastern lineup into the fifth and escaped a jam in the sixth despite the Husky offense putting two runners in scoring position. Jeff Costello gave the ball quite a ride during the rally as he pulled an inside fastball down the left field line, but it hooked foul, and Fleming escaped the inning.

“Tip your cap to their pitchers tonight,” Glavine said. “They did a really good job and had us sort of playing defense when we had runners in scoring position.”

The Northeastern defense didn’t exactly help out their teammates on the mound, as shortstop Spenser Smith booted a ground ball early on, and Ben Malgeri and Costello nearly collided as they let a third-inning ball drop in the gap.

“We had a couple defensive mistakes out there that cost us again,” Glavine said. “Against a team like that or really any team you can’t can’t give them extra routes.”

Despite Keane’s unfortunate start, the Huskies had some good performances from the rest of the pen, as Rick Burroni, James Quinlivan, and Jake Gigliotti all tossed effective innings. The damage was done, however, and Demon Deacons ran away with the 9–0 victory.

“We just weren’t as sharp tonight, weren’t as competitive, fell behind early again, second day in a row makes it tough coming back against the pitching they have,” Glavine said.

Northeastern Baseball Falls to Wake Forest in Season Opener

By Jordan Baron

These days, it’s pretty routine to find a baseball team at the AA level or higher where a majority of the pitching staff can throw 95 or higher. What’s abnormal is when a college team has that.

But that’s exactly what the Northeastern Huskies faced in their Friday night season opener, as they squared off on the road against the No. 17 Wake Forest Demon Deacons and their 11 flamethrowers. And, to everyone’s surprise, the unranked Huskies put up quite the fight against their ACC opponent. They fought back from an early deficit to take the lead in the middle innings before a three-run bomb and some good relief work gave the Deacons an 8–6 win.

“Pretty fun college baseball game and thought it was pretty well played by both teams,” Northeastern head coach Mike Glavine said. “Not the result that we wanted, but certainly a really good battle.”

Northeastern redshirt senior starter Kyle Murphy went five innings and gave up five earned runs across that span, four of which came in the first. The Huskies outhit the Deacons 12 to six but couldn’t convert the hits into runs, as they left eight men on base.

Murphy did not begin his season the way would’ve liked to, hitting the first batter he faced before giving up a double and a walk to load the bases. Junior catcher Shane Muntz punished the right-hander with a bomb of a grand slam to put the Deacons up by four.

Murphy settled in after that, and pitched extremely well for four innings, giving up just one more run and retiring the last six batters he faced. Murphy, whose K/9 sat at around 12.5 during last-year’s pandemic shortened season, fanned seven batters in his five innings.

“He’s a veteran, but even still for him it’s [the] first inning, it’s outside, it’s another team, and just kind of settling in. Once he got through that first inning . . . he pitched really well,” Glavine said.

The Husky offense faced the mighty arm of sophomore firebender Ryan Cusick, whose fastball topped out at nearly 100 mph on the evening. The #40 ranked prospect in college baseball lived up to his reputation; through five innings he had retired eight batters via the punchout and given up just three hits.

“There’s less room for error,” Glavine noted. “Obviously you can’t get down when you strike out or feel like you’re not grinding. And you got to find ways to lengthen at bats, make them work a little bit, try to drive up pitch counts and then wait for mistakes. You’ve got to be ready for them.”

Cusick had all the confidence coming out for the sixth, and with a 5–0 deficit against a nationally ranked team, the Huskies were in a very tough spot.

Suddenly, however, Northeastern caught up to Cusick’s fastball, as redshirt sophomore Ben Malgeri doubled to lead off the inning and advanced to third on a groundout to get himself 90 feet from scoring the Huskies’ first run. Redshirt junior Ian Fair used his power to muscle a fly ball to deep center for an easy sacrifice fly.

With two outs, the scoring threat looked to be neutralized, but the resilient Huskies slapped two straight singles to give redshirt sophomore Corey DiLoreto an opportunity for more damage. The first baseman took it and smacked a laser beam down the left field line that barely bounced in fair territory for a double, scoring both runs and bringing the Huskies within two. Cusick completed the inning, but his pitch count was too high to go any further.

“Strikeouts can add up,” Glavine said. “Even though they stink as far as not putting balls in play, if you force him to throw four, five, six pitches to punch you out, you hope that helps out later.”

Northeastern kept the ball rolling in the seventh and eighth against the Wake Forest bullpen, striking for one in the former and two in the latter to take a 6–5 lead. Redshirt sophomore Owen Langan pitched two innings of scoreless relief in the home half of the sixth and seventh, striking out two Deacons and not allowing a hit.

Entering the late innings, the Huskies looked poised to take a victory in their season opener. However, Deacon freshman Brock Wilken had other ideas, as he rocketed a ball down the left field line and over the fence for a three-run homer off redshirt junior reliever Brandon Dufault. The Deacons finished with a 1-2-3 ninth and snatched the victory.

“We’ll just regroup tonight,” Glavine said. “Tomorrow [we’ll] see how the guys feel and try to get some other guys in there . . . I think they got a couple freshmen arms in there tonight which is something they probably want to do and same for us, trying to get different arms in.”

The Huskies will send sophomore Sebastian Keane to the hill tomorrow to face junior William Fleming.

Northeastern Baseball Falls to Red Sox

By Milton Posner

Imagine, for a moment, being Matt Lord or Dave Howarth.

Both are freshmen position players for the Huskies. Neither saw any playing time during the team’s first three games, all decisive losses to the Alabama Crimson Tide in Tuscaloosa. So they made their collegiate debuts on Friday afternoon in Fort Myers, Florida.

Lord and Howarth’s last games were in high school. Today they played the Boston Red Sox.

The Huskies hung around for most of the afternoon, but a sixth-inning offensive breakthrough handed the Sox a 3–0 win. The game — along with the Detroit Tigers’ matchup against the Southeastern University Fire — was the first MLB action of the year. The Huskies have faced the Sox 18 times — including every one of the last 17 years — and have never won.

The Huskies threatened quickly, with senior infielder Scott Holzwasser earning a 3–0 count, nearly homering when his drive off Daniel McGrath just hooked foul, then took ball four low and away. But Holzwasser gave it all back a few minutes later when McGrath picked him off. It wasn’t a particularly artful or creative move to first, just a moderately deceptive maneuver that completely froze Holzwasser and hung him out to dry.

The first few innings were marked by clumsy fielding. Though the box score shows just two errors — both were Sox miscues — both teams fumbled the ball plenty. Some resulted in outs when the fielders recovered, others were ruled as hits. The first error came after Northeastern’s Kyle Peterson walked, when a scalding ground ball off the bat of Northeastern’s Jake Rosen leapt into the chest of Sox third baseman Chad De La Guerra. But with two on and two out, McGrath fanned Husky center fielder Jared Dupere to silence the threat.

Dupere couldn’t stand looking bad for long. In the Boston half of the first, Jarren Duran smacked a sinking fly into medium center field. Dupere sprinted to his right and made a nifty sliding snag to keep Duran off the basepaths, allowing freshman hurler Cam Schlittler to escape the inning without a problem.

Northeastern’s best chance arguably came in the second inning. After Corey DiLoreto was called out on strikes, junior outfielder Jeff Costello pulled a line drive into left field. Boston left fielder John Andreoli was shading a bit toward center, so Costello dashed toward second and beat the throw with a headfirst slide. This is no easy feat in JetBlue Park — the Sox’s spring training ballpark has the same dimensions and features as Fenway Park in Boston, including the famously shallow left field wall.

The Huskies had a runner on first with only one out, but again squandered the opportunity through baserunning mistakes. After Teddy Beaudet went down swinging, Costello tried to swipe third base. A strong, accurate throw from Boston catcher Connor Wong cut Costello down, depriving Spenser Smith of an RBI chance and sending the Huskies back into the field empty-handed.

Costello’s decision to steal third with two outs would ordinarily make no sense, but in this game it’s more understandable. He was born in Lexington, 13 miles northwest of Boston. He played high school ball just a few miles from Fenway Park. Maybe he just wanted to steal a base against the Red Sox.

The next few innings proceeded without major intrigue. Neither team capitalized on the other’s fielding missteps. Northeastern turned ground-ball, inning-ending double plays in the third and fourth innings to neutralize the Sox. Both teams substituted liberally in a seven-inning game: the Sox used 19 position players and seven pitchers, while the Huskies deployed 15 position players and six pitchers.

The Huskies came close to getting on the board in the fifth inning. After Peterson reached base for the second time, All-CAA First Teamer Ian Fair slammed a shot down the right field line that raised the Husky hopes, but ultimately fell foul. Fair struck out a minute later on Denyi Reyes’ 32nd pitch of the inning.

In the bottom of the fifth, Northeastern’s Nick David retired the Sox in order, the first 1-2-3 inning of the afternoon for either squad. Eduard Bazardo would do the same to the Huskies in the top of the seventh, but every other half inning saw runners reach base.

In the bottom of the sixth, the Sox finally broke the stalemate. Marcus Wilson walked, then swiped second base when Husky catcher Dave Howarth’s throw arrived too late. Northeastern hurler Rick Burroni retired the next two hitters to hold Wilson at second, but second baseman Ryan Fitzgerald smacked a ball into the right-center field gap to plate Wilson.

When Burroni walked the next two hitters to load the bases with two outs, Northeastern head coach Mike Glavine took the ball from him, making Burroni the only pitcher for either team to be pulled partway through an inning. The move didn’t pay off, as new pitcher Henry Ennen gave up a two-run single to Jantzen Witte to arrive at the 3–0 final score.

It was the first game for Red Sox interim manager Ron Roenicke, who took the helm after two years as the team’s bench coach and five years as manager of the Milwaukee Brewers. Roenicke replaced Alex Cora, who was fired by the Red Sox after his prominent role in the Houston Astros’ illegal sign-stealing scheme was uncovered. The Sox’s lineup featured AA and AAA ballplayers looking to boost their stock before the season starts next months.

The Huskies, still seeking their first win of the season, will head north to Tampa for a three-game series against the University of South Florida. That series begins with a doubleheader on Saturday, with first pitch at 2 PM EST.

Men’s baseball splits four-game series with Mizzou

By: Alexander Tsipis

On Friday, the Huskies began a four-game series against the University of Missouri Tigers at City of Palms Park in Fort Myers.  Led by 2017 freshman All-American Kameron Misner, the Tigers boast one of the most powerful lineups in the country (9.3 runs per game). The Huskies sent senior right hander Brian Christian to the mound in game one. The Tigers jumped on him early after a two-out double plated two in the first. But, Christian kept the Huskies in the game, allowing three runs on four hits in four innings of work while also tallying three strikeouts. Andrew Misiaszek threw three scoreless innings in relief for Northeastern before Mizzou was able to collect three, two-out hits in the bottom of the 8th, adding two late insurance runs. Across the diamond, Mizzou started Bryce Montes De Oca, a 6-foot-7 redshirt junior right hander who tops out at 99 mph. He kept the Huskies at bay, going 6 1/3 innings allowing four hits and a run while striking out eight as the Tigers beat the Huskies, 5-2.

Saturday featured a doubleheader between the Huskies and Tigers. Northeastern jumped out to an early 3-0 lead thanks to a pair of first inning doubles by senior shortstop Max Burt and junior infielder Ryan Solomon. The Tigers answered with a run in each of the next two innings. Huskies starting pitcher Tyler Brown was brilliant on the mound, allowing just those runs (one earned) before settling in and throwing six masterful innings. Huskies head coach Mike Glavine decided to go to the bullpen after a 6th inning home run by junior Jake Farrell gave the Huskies a 4-2 lead. Mizzou stormed back by putting a five-spot on the board in the bottom of the 7th, but the Huskies answered right back with three of their own in the top of the 8th. The Tigers scored one more in their half of the inning when an aggressive takeout slide broke up what would have been an inning ending double play.  Two quick outs in the top of the 9th left the Huskies trailing 8-6 and down to their final strike when sophomore Kyle Peterson walked, sparking a Huskies rally.  Junior Mason Koppens slapped a two-strike single through the left side and junior Charlie McConnell doubled down the left field line, securing a 10-8 comeback Huskies win. This was the program’s first victory over an SEC school.

Continue reading “Men’s baseball splits four-game series with Mizzou”

Northeastern Baseball Swept By William & Mary

By: Ravi Pandya

The Huskies entered this series with a 7-4 record (19-16) overall. The William & Mary Tribe had a 6-5 record (17-20 overall). The Huskies appeared to have the advantage in their starting pitching matchups. On Friday, Huskies ace Aaron Civale faced off against Nick Brown. On Saturday, James Mulry faced Bodie Sheehan. On Sunday, Dustin Hunt pitched against Dan Powers. All three of the pitchers for the Huskies had a significantly better ERA than the three Tribe starting pitchers. In fact, all three of the starting pitchers for the Tribe had an ERA over 5. Coming off of a two game losing streak, this matchup looked like exactly what the Huskies needed in order to get back on track.

On Friday, Civale and Nick Brown had a great pitching duel going on. Neither of them allowed a run through the first seven innings. The Tribe left six men on base through the first seven innings, and the Huskies left three men on base. In the top of the 8th inning, Cullen Large and Charley Gould hit back-to-back two out singles off of Civale. Then, with runners on first and third, and Ryder Miconi at the plate, Josh Treff had a passed ball which caused Large to score the first run of the game. In the top of the 9th inning, Josh Smith hit an opposite field solo homerun off of Tyler Robinson. After eight strong shutout innings from Nick Brown, Joseph Gaouette struck out the side to get his seventh save of the season.

On Saturday, Mulry performed below expectations for the Huskies. He allowed four runs (two earned) in 4.1 innings.  In the top of the third inning, Cullen Large hit a two run homerun off of him. In the top of the fifth inning, a costly error by Max Burt allowed two more runs to cross the plate. Unlike Friday, the Huskies batters did fight back. In the bottom of the fifth inning, the Huskies scored five runs off of a Cam Walsh two-run single, a Charlie McConnell RBI single, a Mason Koppens bunt RBI single, and a Keith Kelly RBI single. Unfortunately for the Huskies, Andrew Misiaszek and Mike Fitzgerald proceeded to give up two runs each in the 7th and 8th innings respectively to give the Tribe an 8-5 lead. After Bodie Sheehan gave up five runs to the Huskies in the fifth inning, Mitchell Aker did a good job in bridging the game to their closer without giving up a run. Gaouette then came and got his eighth save of the season without giving up a hit.

On Sunday, Dustin Hunt and Dan Powers had another pitching duel. Through six innings, neither pitcher allowed a run. In the top of the seventh inning, Josh Smith hit a two-run homerun off of Hunt. In the top of the 9th inning, Smith got another RBI, this time a single off of Tyler Robinson. After seven strong innings from Powers, Charlier Fletcher and Robert White pitched a shutout inning each to clinch the sweep against the Huskies

The Huskies look to end their five-game losing streak against Central Connecticut State next weekend at Friedman Diamond.

Northeastern Baseball Drops Two Of Three To Elon

By: Ravi Pandya

Coming off of a thrilling Beanpot win against Harvard, the Huskies looked to keep the momentum going with a weekend series against Elon. Northeastern came into the series with a 14-12 record overall and a 3-2 record against CAA opponents.

On Friday, the Huskies won in relatively easy fashion as they beat the Phoenix 6-3 behind an Aaron Civale quality start and runs batted in from Charlie McConnell, Max Burt, Cam Walsh, Josh Treff, and Mason Koppens. After eight solid innings from Civale, which included six strikeouts, and three earned runs allowed, the Huskies turned it over to Mike Fitzgerald to finish the game. Fitzgerald did not disappoint as he retired the three batters he faced without any trouble.

The second game of the series proved to be the toughest pitching matchup for the Huskies. James Mulry pitched well, and only gave up one run off of a Tyler McVicar RBI single in the fourth inning. In the seventh inning, Andrew Misiaszek gave up an RBI single to Ryne Ogren. Misiaszek proceeded to finish the game without allowing any further damage. Unfortunately for the Huskies, those two runs were all that the Elon pitching staff needed. Michael Elefante pitched 8 innings of fast-paced shutout baseball. He constantly kept hitters off balance and only allowed two hits in his outing.  After those eight innings, Elon closer Chris Hall quickly ended the game on 11 pitches and picked up his sixth save of the year.

The rubber match of the series appeared on paper to be a relatively easy win for the Huskies. However, the game played on the field proved that it would not be the case. Elon’s starting pitcher, Jordan Barrett, came into the game with an ERA over 7. On the other hand, potential future draft MLB draft pick Dustin Hunt was on the mound for the Huskies. After escaping trouble in the first couple of innings, Barrett was able to settle into the game and pitch 6 innings with two runs allowed. Those runs came off of a Zach Perry RBI double in the 1st and a Nolan Lang sac fly in the 6th.  Dustin Hunt cruised through the first six innings, and only allowed an RBI single to Kory Shumate. However, he did allow an opposite field homerun to Tyler McVicar that was heavily carried by the wind. After Hunt allowed two runs in 7 innings, Tyler Robinson came in for relief and did not allow a hit in either of the two innings that he pitched. After Barrett left the game for the Phoenix after six innings, Chris Hall pitched four shutout innings including an extra inning in the tenth. In the top of the tenth inning, Mike Fitzgerald allowed an RBI single to Shumate that ended up being the game-winning run for the Phoenix. Chris Hall won his second game of the season after completing the game for Elon.

The Huskies’ next week consists of a Wednesday game against Quinnipiac and a weekend series at Delaware.

 

Huskies Down Harvard 3-2 in Semifinals of Baseball Beanpot

By: Mack Krell

Northeastern (14-12) and Harvard (7-15) faced off on Wednesday at 3:30 at Friedman Diamond in the Beanpot Semifinals. This is the 26th year of the Beanpot Tournament, which Northeastern has won 5 times and Harvard has won 4 times. Nate Borges started on the mound for the Huskies and Simon Rosenblum-Larson started for the Harvard Crimson.

After a quiet first inning, Northeastern got the scoring started in the 2nd inning on a Jake Farrell triple to center field. Cam Walsh and Zach Perry scored on the hit off of starter Rosenblum-Larson. Jake Farrell finished the game 2-3 with 2 RBI’s and one strikeout.

Harvard responded in the bottom of the third inning on two singles by Trent Bryan and John Fallon. After Drew Reid reached on a throwing error and Mitch Klug reached after being hit by a pitch, Bryan hit a single to score Reid and moved Klug to third. Fallon then followed that hit up with another single that scored Bryan after he stole second base. Bryan and Fallon both finished the game 1-4 with 1 hit and 1 RBI.

With the score 2-2, Northeastern pushed across the winning run in the top of the 5th inning. Max Burt hit a ground rule double to right-center field, and then scored on a Cam Walsh single up the middle of the infield. Cam Walsh finished the game 2-4 with 1 run scored and the winning RBI.

Northeastern used four different pitchers in the game. Nate Borges started the game and threw for 2.2 innings while giving up 2 runs and striking out 1 in the process. Will Jahn (1-1), who ultimately received the win for Northeastern, pitched 3.2 innings while striking out 3 and giving up 3 hits. Jahn didn’t allow any runs in his efforts. Mike Fitzgerald was credited with the save for Northeastern, his 4th of the season. He pitched the 9th inning and struck out 2. Rosenblum-Larson started the game for Harvard and pitched 4 innings for the Crimson while giving up 3 hits and 2 earned runs. Kevin Rex (0-1) was credited with the loss for Crimson despite only pitching 1 inning and giving up 1 earned run.

Northeastern now moves on to play in the Beanpot finals on April 20th. Northeastern’s next game is Friday, April 8th against Elon at Friedman Diamond.