Women’s Hockey Falls to BC, 2–1

By Catherine Morrison and Milton Posner

BOSTON — As the Northeastern women’s hockey team trudged to the locker room, passing through the walkway lined with cardboard cutouts of Husky fans and a few curious cardboard dogs, the question was “how.”

Not necessarily how the game was lost, but how did Boston College score two goals in such bizarre fashion? How did Hanna Bilka fire a puck parallel to the goal line into a trio of Huskies and somehow find the back of the net?

How did Aerin Frankel, arguably the best goaltender in the country, let Jillian Fey, who scored just two goals last season, beat her for the second time in two games?

“She went out to play the puck and their kid came up from behind her, she didn’t see it and she didn’t see their player,” Northeastern Head Coach Dave Flint explained. “She jarred the puck loose, and then just got it and wrapped it in. We need to just be better on communication, the D needs to communicate with her. She needs to understand too, that if there is a lot of pressure back there just to dump that puck into space. It’s a learning lesson for everybody, and that’s the first time I can recall that’s happened to us in a long time. So it’s just an unfortunate miscue.”

BC (5–3–0, 5–1–0 WHEA) had already played seven games this season, and Northeastern (1–1–0 HEA) only one. That kind of difference, especially given the team’s November delays due to COVID-19 protocol, make finding a rhythm difficult.

“We had two and a half weeks where we didn’t touch the ice when we got shut down and then we [had] five days to get ready for BC,” he said. “I don’t think we had our game legs either today. Game shape is different from practice, you’ve got to play games to get those legs, so the tough part is when you’re having these weird stretches of game, no game.”

This is not to say that the Huskies didn’t display any fire. They managed to tie the game a few minutes before Fey’s goal, with Katy Knoll slotting home a loose puck off a blocked Peyton Anderson shot.

Knoll, with one of the only bright spots of the game, has had an electric start to the year with two goals in two games after notching just 10 goals total last season. The sophomore will certainly be one to watch as she takes on more responsibility.

Her goal came after sustained pressure in the Eagles’ zone, something Northeastern had a hard time doing in stretches. And when they did, BC netminder Abigail Levy stood tall, stifling or redirecting 34 shots on the evening.

“She’s a big goalie, takes up a lot of net,” Flint noted. “We didn’t make it difficult for her the first two periods. She was seeing all the shots and we weren’t jumping on rebounds, but the third period she came up with some big saves for them and helped secure the win.”

The Fey slip-up notwithstanding, Frankel played a strong game, as BC peppered her with a number of strikes from in close.

“She played great,” Flint said. “We were just sloppy on our own end, and usually that’s one of our strong suits, so we need to be better. Aerin kept us in it the whole time, and that’s what she usually does. We just need to get better, and this week we’ll work on some D-zone, and we have some good video from today’s game that we’ll break down on Tuesday.”

The Huskies’ next game is a New Year’s Day road tilt against Connecticut, though Flint acknowledged that the team is looking for games for this upcoming week.

2020–21 Women’s Hockey East Preview: Boston College

Last Season: 17–16–3 (14–11–2, fourth place conf.); lost to UConn in quarterfinal

Head Coach: Katie Crowley (14th season)

Preseason Poll Finish: Third

Departures: G Molly Barrow, F Erin Connolly, F Delaney Belinskas, F Bridget McCarthy, D/F Kate Annese, F Lindsay Agnew

Additions: F Natalie Tulchinsky, F Christina Klinoff, F Olivia O’Brien, F Caroline Goffredo, F Gaby Roy, F Cecily Hetzel, D Maddie Crowley-Cahill, D Sidney Fess, G Abigail Levy

By Sarah Olender

While Boston College did lose five forwards this offseason, the team is adding six incoming forwards to fill their shoes. The team is also adding two defensemen and one goaltender, Abigail Levy, to fill the shoes of graduated goalie Molly Barrow. 

Levy is a junior transfer goalie from Minnesota State who played over 2000 minutes her freshman year, but only about 1000 minutes her sophomore year. This decrease, especially without a known injury, could be the reason why Levy sought a spot elsewhere. Her strong goaltending could strengthen the Eagles’ defense this year, and the addition of six new forwards will be crucial on the other wide of the puck. 

The loss of Delaney Belinskas hurts, as she chipped in 20 goals and led the squad with a .142 scoring percentage. Lindsey Agnew’s departure is a setback as well, depriving the Eagles of scoring and playmaking. Yet the Eagles are still strong enough to trail only Northeastern and Boston University in the preseason poll.

Bottom Line: The Eagles are losing some key contributors, and the team that remains is fairly young. But they remain one of the few teams that can challenge conference favorite Northeastern on any given night.

Women’s Hockey Topples No. 6 BC

Photo by Sarah Olender

By Catherine Morrison

No. 4 Northeastern faced its biggest opponent yet Tuesday night when they visited No. 6 Boston College. Northeastern was coming off of a win against New Hampshire, BC off a win over Boston University. The two rivals battled, but Northeastern came on top 3-0.

The first period started slow, but with 13:12 left in the first period, NU’s Matti Hartman gained control of the puck and dished to Chloe Aurard, who sent it to Alina Mueller. Mueller raced down the ice and shot into the left side of the goal to put the Huskies on the board.

A few minutes later, another Mueller attempt missed wide. BC’s Erin Connolly charged after Mueller, lost her balance, and slid ribs-first into the goalpost; she was fine after a few moments on the ice.

Northeastern goalie Aerin Frankel held strong the whole game, saving 31 shots. With 4:30 remaining in the first, the lost her glove and stick and still held the Eagles at bay. Shortly after, she stretched out onto the ice to deflect a shot from BC’s Kelly Browne.

The second period was a puck-control battle devoid of power plays. BC edged Northeastern with a 14–10 shots-on-goal margin, but they couldn’t beat Frankel. When Lindsay Agnew sent an airborne shot toward the goal, Frankel caught it. Hadley Hartmetz and Savannah Norcross tried to fire one by her; Frankel stopped them both with glove saves. The only time BC came close to scoring was a Hannah Bilka shot off the pipe.

After ten minutes of back and forth in the third, Northeastern regained their momentum. Aurard slid the puck across the goal to Skylar Fontaine, who cleaned it up.

After Fontaine just missed a second goal a minute later, BC’s Cayla Barnes and NU’s Jess Schryver collided near the wall. Barnes remained on the ice and ended up exiting the game.

With five minutes left, Aurard joined the scoring when Mueller passed to her on the power play.

After the game, Northeastern coach Dave Flint remarked that BC was Northeastern’s biggest test so far this season. Chloe Aurard agreed, saying it felt good to beat one of their biggest rivals.

The win moved the Huskies to 11–1 (8–1 HEAW) and dropped the Eagles to 10–2–1 (9–2–1 HEAW). Northeastern looks to keep their six-game winning streak going on Saturday against the Maine Black Bears.