Huskies Bring out the Brooms for Doubleheader Sweep at Hofstra

Story by Khalin Kapoor

Photos by Sadie Parker

HEMPSTEAD, NY — The Northeastern Huskies (14–6) swept the Hofstra Pride (9–9) in a Saturday doubleheader, winning game one 3–2 and game two 13–5.

Northeastern was able to grind out a victory in game one due to stellar pitching from starter Kyle Murphy and clutch hitting from right fielder Jared Dupere. The Huskies took the momentum from that win and carried into their offensive explosion in game two, powered once again by Dupere along with center fielder Ben Malgeri, catcher Matt Olson, and shortstop Spenser Smith.

Game one was a pitchers’ duel through and through between Northeastern starter Kyle Murphy and Hofstra starter Jimmy Joyce. Murphy notched a career-high 12 punchouts over six and a third innings of work, scattering five hits and allowing two runs. Murphy set down seven straight hitters by way of the K and has struck out 22 over his last two starts. Joyce matched Murphy stride for stride and was arguably better, spinning seven innings, striking out 13 batters, and allowing two earned runs.

“Joyce was awesome for Hofstra,” Northeastern head coach Mike Glavine remarked. “Really really electric . . . and everything was a struggle for us.”

Even though they had trouble getting their bats going against Joyce, the Huskies took advantage of some Hofstra miscues throughout the game, scoring one run each on a balk and a passed ball. Taking what the other team gives you is something Northeastern was trying to improve upon coming into this series.

In the sixth inning against Joyce, Dupere launched a homer to right field, increasing Northeastern’s lead to 3–1 and effectively icing the game.

Northeastern fireballer Brandon Dufault shut down Hofstra in the ninth, notching his second save of the season and securing a game one victory. Murphy, reliever Eric Yost, and Dufault combined to tally 13 strikeouts against just one walk and six hits. In a game where offense was at a premium, the bullpen putting zeroes on the board and taking some pressure off of Murphy was incredibly clutch.

“Game one was a grind, it could have gone either way,” Glavine said. “The guys battled in what was not an easy game . . . [They] played well under pressure, and we came out on top.”

In game two, the Huskies came out firing on all cylinders, plating four runs in the second courtesy of a two-run blast by Olson and another bomb by Dupere. They would never relinquish this lead.

Husky starter Sebastian Keane spun six quality innings to get the win, allowing two runs and striking out eight. Keane benefitted from stellar defense behind him — including some highlight-reel plays by Spenser Smith — and the early four-run cushion that he was tasked with protecting.

“Keane was good . . . though he would tell you it was not his best,” Glavine said. “He fought and he battled . . . settled in and gave us six strong innings.”

After entering the final three innings of action up 6-2, the Huskies went for the jugular, tacking on seven more runs. Leadoff hitter Ben Malgeri hit his first home run of the season, Jared Dupere continued his domination with an RBI double, Kyle Peterson hit a two-run triple, and Spenser Smith capped off the scoring with a solo homer in the ninth.

“Offensively, the guys really took over,” Glavine said. “It was really just a great team win.”

Game one was a grind for Northeastern, but getting that first win was huge to relax the team heading into game two. That relaxed approach led to better at-bats, and with the momentum from the previous win the Huskies struck early and played under less pressure. In game one, Northeastern batters struck out 15 times. Compare that to game two, where they struck out only twice. This progression is a testament to how this team can quickly adapt and change its approach.

This weekend against Hofstra marks the first of many conference series for Northeastern. So far they couldn’t have asked for a better start, as they’ve won their first three and will look to chalk up a fourth against Hofstra on Sunday.

Huskies Fall to High-Flying Eagles

Story by Khalin Kapoor

Photos by Sadie Parker

BROOKLINE, MA — The Northeastern Huskies (10–6) fell to the Boston College Eagles (14–13) 5–3 on Tuesday afternoon in a slow-paced and mostly uneventful game.

The Eagles scored two runs in the second inning and didn’t look back, never relinquishing their lead and leaning on their talented pitching staff to close out the win. Starter Joe Mancini spun six solid innings, allowing just two runs and striking out four.

“Give Mancini and their relievers credit,” Northeastern head coach Mike Glavine said. “We couldn’t get anything on the barrel for a bunch of innings.”

In Northeastern’s defense, they were coming off a ten-day hiatus after their series against the University of Rhode Island was canceled. Their bats were rusty early in the game and they needed time to adjust.

But BC took advantage. Shades of the Huskies’ regular production were evident later in the game, but they couldn’t get that one big hit with runners in scoring position to really make themselves competitive.

“You gotta play really well against a team like that,” said Glavine. “We just kinda played okay and they took advantage.”

The ten-day break also presented pitching complications for the Huskies, who opted to run a bullpen game in lieu of a traditional starter. Starter Kyle Long pitched the first, reliever Wyatt Scotti pitched the second and third, Eric Yost spun the next three scoreless, and Brian Rodriguez finished the last three, allowing two runs. Scotti was saddled with the loss after allowing the first runs of the game to BC in the second. This move was done in order to try and stretch out as many pitchers as possible after not playing over the past week and a half.

“[I wanted to] just get some guys out there and get the adrenaline going again,” Glavine remarked. “[We’ll] pitch a bunch of guys tomorrow.”

In the sixth inning, down 3–0, Northeastern provided some excitement in the form of back-to-back jacks from second baseman Scott Holzwasser and left fielder Jared Dupere. 

It looked as if the Huskies were nearing a comeback, but they fell just short, consistently stranding their runners in scoring position and allowing BC to tack on two insurance runs.

“I thought we had a little momentum there after those two solo home runs,” remarked Glavine. “But … they ended up taking the momentum right back.”

The Huskies will look for some consistency in their schedule going forward. We’ve seen how successful they can be when they get going; they came into this game having won their last six. But this was the third time this season the Huskies have had 10 days between games, and it showed.

The Huskies play next on Wednesday at UMass Amherst at 3 PM.

Huskies Shut Out Bulldogs for Third Straight Win

Story by Catherine Morrison

Photos by Sadie Parker

BROOKLINE, MA — Northeastern (7–5) continued their winning streak on a chilly Tuesday afternoon against Bryant (2–7), scoring five and shutting out the Bulldogs.

The theme for the Huskies this season has been feast or famine. Northeastern will stack the runs early, then lose the lead in the bottom half with poor defense and a dearth of hits. Thankfully for the Huskies, Tuesday’s tilt was nothing of the like. 

Wyatt Scotti started for Northeastern and threw a solid three innings, giving up only three hits and one walk. After Scotti was pulled, Northeastern cycled through a new pitcher every inning or so against a lesser opponent. 

“The strategy was just to get some guys in who we hadn’t used in a little bit but they’re guys that we rely on,” Northeastern head coach Mike Glavine explained. “So you gotta think long term here . . . We gotta think about conference games coming up. Eventually we’re gonna have four game weekends so we’re gonna have to rely on a lot of pitchers.”

One such standout was Eric Yost, who threw the fifth and sixth innings. He only gave up one hit and had three of the Huskies four strikeouts.

Bryant followed Northeastern’s pitcher-cycling strategy but proved much less successful. Starting pitcher Luke Garofalo did okay in the first inning, but lost his way in the top of the second. He started off by walking Max Viera. The next batter, Jeff Costello, laid down a bunt and practically flew to first base, beating out the throw to put runners on first and second. 

Garofalo gave up two more hits to put Northeastern in the lead, 2–0, and was only saved when Teddy Beaudet was caught stealing to end the inning. 

Garofalo’s replacement, John MacDonald, looked wild in the bottom of the third. He threw hard but had trouble with his control, often throwing in the dirt or missing the catcher entirely to hit the backstop with a loud thunk. He was clearly thrown off his game and hesitated at the mound long enough to draw a pitch clock violation.

MacDonald inherited Scott Holzwasser on first base, who promptly stole second. MacDonald was clearly rattled and walked the next batter he faced, Ben Malgeri. Holzwasser advanced on a wild pitch and scored on the second out, a pop fly to right field. The inning ended when Malgeri was caught stealing. 

MacDonald settled down in the fourth inning with a strikeout, but found himself in trouble in the fifth. Holzwasser singled to right, sending MacDonald to the top of the lineup with one out. Malgeri did not disappoint and got a base hit, sending Holzwasser to second. This was the end of the line for MacDonald, who was replaced by Mike Randazzo.

Holzwasser and Malgeri continued Northeastern’s strategy of aggressive baserunning and stole third and second respectively. Ryan Cervone hit a sac fly to score Holzwasser and end the inning at 3–0. 

Northeastern scored a couple more sac fly runs in the fifth and seventh innings to continue their streak of small ball. 

“Offensively that might have been our best game of the year,” Glavine said. “Made some great plays out there, that was just some kind of timely hitting on offense . . . I thought it was a really clean game by us — hit really well, defended really well.”

Brian Rodriguez was tagged to close and did not disappoint, getting a quick one-two-three inning with one strikeout and two groundouts. On the last at bat Shane Kelly grounded out to shortstop, with Husky first baseman Ian Fair stretching to make an incredible catch of the shortstop’s throw.

Although Fair has struggled offensively this season, Glavine was impressed with his performance Tuesday. 

“Ian Fair is an amazing kid,” Glavine said. “I don’t think he’s ever had a bad day, he’s always just so positive and so he’s such a positive energetic guy around the team so he has that effect, he is a plus plus defender . . . He’s just too talented to not hit and he’s gonna change our lineup tremendously once he feels more comfortable in the box.”

Tuesday’s victory increased the Huskies’ winning streak to three ahead of a big series this weekend against Villanova. 

“The momentum was huge,” Glavine noted. “We want to start feeling good about ourselves and getting on a roll. Always want to play well at home and we’ve done that over the years and that’s a priority for us, so just want to build up our confidence and start to feel confident in all things we do.”

Northeastern Falls 3–2 to Old Dominion After a Walk-Off in the 11th

By Sarah Olender

In a hard fought series, Northeastern (3–4) lost the final game against Old Dominion (8–3), 3–2 in eleven innings Sunday afternoon. 

There weren’t many parts of the game that had the socially distanced crowd in Norfolk, Virginia standing up to cheer, but this close game was one of the most exciting because it kept people on the edge of their seats. 

Both teams displayed elite performances, holding each other to one run each until extra innings and chipping away at each other’s pitchers. 

“I thought it was a great series,” Northeastern head coach Mike Glavine said. “I thought we played well these last couple of days and we really only had one bad inning all weekend long and it swung the whole series, but this thing could have went either way.” 

Cam Schlittler started for the Huskies. In comparison to his performance in the Wake Forest series, he walked a few more batters, but still battled through each inning.  He gave up five hits and struck out four.

“He definitely wasn’t as sharp today. His command was a little bit off. His velocity was good and he was strong,” Glavine said. “If that’s him not at his best, six innings and one run, I’ll take that every time. He’s a competitor [and] gave us a chance to win today.”

When Old Dominion left the bases loaded after a series of small hits, one hit-by-pitch, and a walk in the bottom of the second, Northeastern was lucky that the Monarchs had scored only one run.

In the top of the third, Northeastern started making contact with Monarch starter Ryne Moore’s previously untouchable pitching. Jeff Costello singled up the middle and made his way to third with a stolen base and smart baserunning on a ground ball from Teddy Beaudet. The Huskies tied it up after Spenser Smith hit a sacrifice fly to center field, bringing Costello home. 

The Huskies’ speed and base-running are among their greatest strengths. Old Dominion did a good job of holding the Huskies on the basepaths, which Glavine credited as one of the reasons why Northeastern didn’t come out on top. 

“We couldn’t quite get it going as much as I’d like to this weekend,” Glavine said. “There’s more to it than just stealing bases.” 

In the sixth inning, Eric Yost went in to relieve Schlittler. He pitched a solid inning, facing three batters, throwing 19 pitches, and striking out one. In the bottom of the eighth, Thomas Balboni came in to pitch and he faced six batters. 

Defensively, Northeastern had a stellar showing. Through nine innings, they had only one error, stranded eight Monarchs on base, and held their opponent to just one run.

In the 10th inning, Brandon Dufault took the mound for the Huskies. Dufault, a veteran reliever with eight strikeouts in his four innings pitched so far this year, had two strikeouts on Sunday, but Old Dominion kept trying to find a way to beat his pitching. 

In the top of the 11th, the Huskies started the inning with Smith on second because of the new tiebreaker rule. Ben Malgeri was next and tapped a sacrifice bunt into play, sending Smith to third. Max Viera followed with a sacrifice fly to right field, allowing the speedy Smith to score. 

Old Dominion quickly caught up. With a runner on second, Robbie Petracci hit a double off of Dufault, sending home the tying run while keeping the winning run on base. 

The Monarchs then decided to pinch run Zach Coldsnow for Petracci as Brock Gagliardi stepped up to bat. With no outs and a runner in scoring position, Gagliardi, who was 0-2 on the day, found the confidence to send one to left-center, ending the game with a walk-off single, bringing the final score 3–2. 

The Huskies will return home for a Tuesday tilt with Albany.