18 and Counting: Huskies Topple Pride, 10–3

By Milton Posner

What seemed in the early stages like another Northeastern blowout, then like a war of bullpen attrition as Hofstra made a late-inning rally, wound up being another Northeastern blowout after all.

A 10–3 win boosted the Huskies to a 16–0 conference record (28–6 overall) and extended their win streak to 18 games, the longest in the nation. That conference start, the best in CAA history, has afforded the Huskies an eight-game division lead; although pandemic schedules are subject to last-minute change, Northeastern has likely clinched first place already.

The nature of the game begot unorthodox substitution patterns. The Huskies and Pride were just three games removed from the capper of their four-game weekend series, and both have four-game series beginning in two days. (Milton Posner and Catherine Morrison will call Northeastern’s Friday, Saturday, and Sunday games live for WRBB.)

The Huskies answered the time squeeze with a planned bullpen day. Brian Rodriguez started for the first time all season after 11 appearances out of the pen, ceding a hit and a walk in three scoreless innings. 

“Brian has started for us in years past. He had enough rest from the weekend, so it was an easy decision,” Northeastern head coach Mike Glavine explained. “We really wanted to win that first inning and keep the momentum on our side. I thought he did awesome — pounded the strike zone, pitched really well. I didn’t know how many innings he was going to give us; I just told him to go out and see how it went.”

Thomas Balboni, James Quinlivan, Owen Langan, Jake Gigliotti, David Stiehl, Eric Yost, and Brandon Dufault combined to forfeit just three runs the rest of the way. It was the second-most pitchers Glavine has used in a game this season, equaling the 11–2 win over UMass on March 3 (eight pitchers) and trailing only the 11–1 win over UMass on 4/7 (nine). Glavine confirmed that everyone is expected to be available for Friday’s game, save for Rodriguez.

Hofstra used a healthy six pitchers themselves, but it appeared to be a lot less deliberate. Starter Jack Jett — who had tossed six or more innings in six of his eight starts this season — exited the game without recording an out. Five days after the Huskies tagged him for seven runs on ten hits, they tagged him again. But this time, they didn’t need as many hits.

Jeff Costello and Scott Holzwasser walked to open the game. When they attempted a double steal on ball four to Jared Dupere, third baseman Ryan Morash couldn’t handle catcher Nick Marrero’s throw, allowing Costello to score. A Max Viera double cashed in Holzwasser and chased Jett from the game.

“That’s their Friday starter; he just pitched against us the other day,” Glavine noted. “They were probably thinking the same thing we were — wanting to win the first inning and get the momentum. So they gave it to one of their best starters.”

Michael O’Hanlon was first out of the pen for the Pride, and though he retired the side in order, back-to-back sacrifice flies from Danny Crossen and Ben Malgeri completed an odd Husky inning: four runs on just one hit, with no runners stranded.

“It might have been our best offensive inning of the whole year,” Glavine said. “Our guys really grinded out at-bats. We got to two strikes a couple of times but they couldn’t put us away. We really made [Jett] work.”

From then on, the Pride were left to play the same sort of bullpen game the Huskies did. And though O’Hanlon, Chris Mott, and Tristan Nemjo allowed just three combined hits in six innings of work, they still forfeited three runs to the Huskies. It was only in the ninth inning that the Huskies scored by stringing hits together. All told, the Huskies produced 10 runs on the afternoon using ten hits (including four doubles, two from Max Viera), six walks, six stolen bases in six tries, and three hit-by-pitches.

“We didn’t get the long ball today,” Glavine noted. “It was a bit of a hard day to hit; the wind was blowing in, so that’s what we need to be able to do — grind out those at-bats, make them work, drive up pitch counts, work our walks, get hit by pitches, steal bases, put pressure on them, and then get some big hits. We also had some big sacrifice flies. We talk about having a dynamic, relentless offense that scores runs in a lot of different ways. Today we didn’t do it with the home run; we did it with everything else, which was really great to see.”

After six empty innings to start the game, Hofstra finally broke through against Husky hurler Jake Gigliotti, manufacturing a run with a single, a walk, and a single. David Stiehl finished the inning in Gigliotti’s stead, but ceded two runs of his own in the eighth on a two-run double by Kevin Bruggeman. Eric Yost came on and nearly got burned on his first pitch to Brian Goulard, but the fly ball settled into Ben Malgeri’s glove on the center field warning track to neutralize the threat.

A home run would have pulled the Pride within two runs. But the Huskies posted their three spot in the top of the following frame, and the 10–3 final score barely reflected the fingerprints of the snuffed-out Hofstra rally. The Huskies retained their streak, and the attention that has accompanied it.

“We’re streaking. We’re just kind of embracing it, owning it. Every day there’s more confidence than there was the day before,” Glavine said. “No one’s arrogant, no one’s taking anything for granted, no one’s nervous or worried about the streak. We talk about it openly. We know we have the longest streak in the country. We love it.”

“We know everybody wants to beat us,” he continued. “We know every time we play a game now, someone can knock us off. The guys keep rising to the occasion. If anything, it’s heightened their focus, their energy, their passion, and their enjoyment of the game. It really works for us in so many positive ways and it’s been great to see.”

Huskies Extend Win Streak to NCAA-Best 16

By Adam Doucette

BROOKLINE, MA — Northeastern baseball continued their NCAA-leading win streak Saturday with a doubleheader sweep against the Hofstra Pride. The two wins moved them to 14–0 in conference play and 26–6 overall, and built their win streak to 16 games.

“We try to have fun with it,” Northeastern head coach Mike Glavine said of the streak. “I’m sure there’s a little added pressure, but at the end of the day it’s something to be proud of.”

On the day that the seniors were honored before the action began, redshirt senior Kyle Murphy started game one for the Huskies. He went seven innings, giving up only three runs on four hits in the 5–3 win.

“These guys have given us contributions in so many different ways,” Glavine said of the senior class. “Just great teammates, great people — they’ve given the university a ton, given me a ton, given each other a ton, and they’re not done yet.”

The Pride jumped out to an early lead on a long home run by first baseman Rob Weissheier, but Husky second baseman Scott Holzwasser answered in the bottom of the first with a solo shot of his own to tie the game.

In the fourth inning, Husky third baseman Danny Crossen slapped a double down the left field line to score Jared Dupere. It was one of three hits in the game for Crossen.

The scoring let up until the top of the sixth, when Weissheier smashed his second home run of the game to give the Pride a 3–2 edge heading to the bottom of the frame. The Huskies again answered the bell on a Teddy Beaudet single to right field to score Crossen and center fielder Ben Malgeri, making it 4–3.

It was again Beaudet with a sacrifice bunt in the eighth to score Crossen and finish up the scoring. It was Crossen’s second time crossing the plate.

Pride starting pitcher Jimmy Joyce struck out 10 through seven innings, but it wasn’t enough to tame the Huskies’ offensive firepower.

“First game was tough, the seniors were great today, and Joyce was awesome for them, so we had to battle,” Glavine said.

While game one featured top-end pitching, game two was a slugfest. Holzwasser scored on a Max Viera single in the bottom of the first, but it was the second inning that was memorable. The Husky offense exploded for eight runs in an inning featuring RBI singles by Crossen and catcher JP Olson, plus a Jeff Costello grand slam that hit the foul pole in left.

The Pride got on the board in the fourth inning on a two-run homer from Santino Rosso, but the Huskies kept it coming with a run in the fifth on a flyout from Olson and the sixth on a homer from Dupere, his CAA-best fourteenth of the year.

“He’s a way better player than I ever was,” Glavine said. “He can run, he can defend, he’s got tremendous power, and he’s a game changer for us . . . he’s clutch.”

The Huskies closed it out with a plethora of pitchers in a rocky ninth inning featuring Thomas Balboni, Owen Batchelder, Craig Demers, and Owen Langan. The Pride added two more runs, but ultimately fell 14–8.

Northeastern starting pitcher Sebastian Keane went 5 ⅓, giving up four earned runs in a performance that was more than enough for the Huskies to get the win.

“Game two was kind of a wild game and didn’t have any flow, but overall I thought we played great today,” Glavine said. “I think they expect to win, but I don’t think they’re overconfident and that’s a fine line. I think we’re in the right place mentally right now, and it’s fun to watch.”

The Huskies finish up the four-game series with the Pride Sunday at 1 PM Eastern at Friedman Diamond. Jack Sinclair will have the call for WRBB.

Huskies Blow Away Delaware in Doubleheader Sweep

Story by Khalin Kapoor

Photos by Sarah Olender

BROOKLINE, MA — On a tempestuous Friday afternoon, the Northeastern Huskies (17–6, 5–0 CAA) grinded out two tough wins against the Delaware Blue Hens (8–12, 4–6 CAA), winning game one 1–0 and game two 6–5.

With these wins, Northeastern remains undefeated in CAA play despite dealing with multiple long breaks between games over the past few weeks. The Huskies were powered by dominant pitching from starters Kyle Murphy and Wyatt Scotti and some clutch hitting from third baseman Danny Crossen.

In game 1, right fielder Jared Dupere ambushed Delaware starter Chris Ludman in the first inning, knocking home the game’s first run with an RBI double. It would turn out to be the only run scored in the entire game.

Murphy spun six scoreless innings in the winning effort, striking out seven and allowing only three hits. Brian Rodriguez then came in to fire two scoreless innings before Eric Yost notched the save in a dominant seven-pitch ninth inning.

“I thought our pitching was awesome in the first game,” Northeastern head coach Mike Glavine remarked. “Murphy, B-Rod, and Yost really made a difference.”

On the other side, Chris Ludman was the hard-luck loser, giving up just that one first-inning run in a complete-game effort. Ludman limited hard contact all game and induced constant ground ball outs, but was still outdueled by Murphy.  

After getting shut out in game one, Delaware began game two with a leadoff triple by star right fielder Kyle Baker, who scored on center fielder Aidan Riley’s groundout. Northeastern starter Wyatt Scotti overcame the rocky start, finishing six innings and only allowing that one run. Scotti had some trouble on the basepaths throughout his start but managed to bear down and pitch himself out of multiple jams.

“Wyatt Scotti was awesome for us,” Glavine said. “He’s been awesome for us this year and he was again today.”

Delaware starter Dom Velazquez struck out nine over five innings, allowing just two earned runs and consistently limiting the damage. Getting hits with runners in scoring position proved to be a challenge for Northeastern against Velazquez and the Delaware bullpen, with the offense leaving 11 runners on base.

“We had so many chances to break it open and extend the lead,” Glavine noted. “But we didn’t and we let them hang around.”

The Husky offense battled back from the deficit in small-ball fashion, stringing together base hits and hitting two sacrifice flies. Going into the top of the eighth inning, Northeastern was winning 4–1 and it seemed that they were well on their way for another W considering how inept the Delaware offense had been up to that point. However, Delaware manufactured a surprising rally against Husky hurlers Owen Langan and Jake Gigliotti. Blue Hen hitters base-hit Northeastern to death in the inning, hitting five singles and taking two free passes to score four runs and take the lead.

“We weren’t disciplined today,” Glavine said. “We played well . . . in the tough conditions [but] they pushed as hard as they could.”

Down 5–4, Northeastern came to bat in the bottom of the eighth and started playing some more small ball against Delaware’s Derek Wakeley, loading the bases for Crossen with a single and a couple of walks. With two outs and in the biggest situation of the game, Crossen laced a base hit into left field, driving home two runs and taking back the lead for the Huskies, 6–5. Crossen’s huge hit was a welcome change in a game where Northeastern consistently had trouble driving runs in with runners in scoring position.

“Danny Crossen is as clutch of a player as I have ever coached,” Glavine said.

Eric Yost was called on to secure the save for the second time after throwing just seven pitches in game one. Yost allowed a double but struck out two and induced a groundout to shortstop Spenser Smith who made a spectacular play to end the game. Yost converted on two high-leverage save opportunities in one day, taking the pressure off the rest of Northeastern’s bullpen.

“I turned into more of a cheerleader in game two trying to keep the energy up,” Glavine noted. “I felt like we were a little tired.”

Friday’s doubleheader began a stretch of four games in two days for Northeastern. Saturday afternoon will be another twin bill, with stars Cam Schlittler and Sebastian Keane slated to start. Northeastern should hope to get as many innings as possible from both starters so as to still conserve their bullpen as much as possible. The Huskies will have to keep the intensity up on Saturday and will look to see their offense heat up going forward.

Milton Posner, Mike Puzzanghera, and Catherine Morrison will call both games for WRBB, with first pitches scheduled for 11 AM and 2 PM.

Grand Slam Lifts Huskies to 14–11 Revenge Win over Wake Forest

By Sarah Olender

After a 9–0 loss last night, the Northeastern baseball team couldn’t be expected to be in high spirits. It couldn’t have been easy to return for a third game against the No. 17 Wake Forest team that dominated in every facet of the game.

Still, the Huskies started strong, with Scott Holzwasser and Ian Fair reaching base and freshman Max Viera driving Holzwasser in on a single. The Huskies kept their lead through the first, with redshirt freshman Cam Schlittler striking out two batters. 

“We finally won the first inning,” said Head Coach Mike Glavine. “We got in there and scored and shut them down, got off to a good start.”

Schlittler walked junior Shane Muntz, who was sent around the bases by a home run to center field from freshman Brock Wilken. The Huskies answered in the top of the third as Holzwasser and Ben Malgeri scored on Jared Dupere base knock. The bats stayed alive as Fair advanced Dupere on a single before a Corey DiLoreto sac fly cashed him in and made it 4–2 in Northeastern’s favor. Clean fielding and another Schlittler strikeout kept the Deacons scoreless in the bottom half.

To start the fourth, Wake Forest dug into their bullpen, bringing out Crawford Wade. A dropped third strike and a Wade overthrow to first put Northeastern’s Spenser Smith on third with two out, and though Wade fanned Holzwasser to end the threat, his pitch count did suffer for the experience. In the bottom of the fourth, Schlittler, still pitching a great game, started losing speed, and had to work himself out of trouble. 

Wake Forest reached into their bullpen again in the fifth, and hurler Reed Mascalo gave up a 436-foot bomb to Dupere on just his third pitch of the game. Northeastern opted to stay with their starter, and a barrage of Deacon hits put traffic on the bases and shrank the Husky lead to 5–3.

Midway through the sixth, as Northeastern began to connect on Mascalo’s pitches, Wake Forest brought in their fourth pitcher of the game, Camden Minacci, with a Northeastern runner on third. A fielder’s choice, an infield single, and a groundout combined to cash in two runs and increase the Husky lead to four.

In the bottom of the sixth, Northeastern finally pulled their starter, and redshirt sophomore Owen Langan took the mound. After a series of small hits and walks loaded the bases, Malgeri lost Pierce Bennett’s fly ball in the sun in right-center. The error closed the score to 7–6 in Northeastern’s favor.

In an effort to regain the momentum, Glavine called on redshirt freshman Thomas Balboni to change things up on the Deacons. Balboni immediately ceded a two-run single to Rémi Lanzoni that drove in two runs and gave the Deacons their first lead. Wake Forest kept smacking singles and loading the bases, eventually batting around and taking a 9–7 lead behind a six-run sixth inning.

But Northeastern didn’t give up. With two men in scoring position, Kyle Peterson drove a single to right field to re-tie the game. Northeastern loaded the bases again and Wake Forest brought Eric Adler to the mound to face Holzwasser in a jam. On a 3-1 count, Adler threw a perfect fastball and Holzwasser capitalized on the opportunity, driving the pitch out to left center. His grand slam brought the score to 13–9 in the Huskies’ favor.  

“A few of those runs defensively we could have hung our heads and felt sorry for ourselves, but we came out fighting,” Glavine siad. “I think that’s going to pay dividends and speak volumes as this season goes on. We come back after a tough inning and keep fighting . . . To give up six runs in an inning and come back and score six was just incredible to see.”

Wake Forest answered a Northeastern RBI sac fly in the top of the eighth with a Chris Lanzilli solo homer in the bottom half. Despite an 11th Wake Forest run in the bottom of the ninth, Brandon Dufault closed out the Deacons by forcing a groundout from Bobby Seymour with two on.

Save for the first three innings of Saturday’s game, the Huskies had a strong weekend against the No. 17 Demon Deacons. Despite losing two of three games in their opening series, they were competitive in most innings.

“This weekend it was a swing or pitch or play away from winning the series against a team like Wake,” Glavine said. “I’m just really proud of the guys this weekend.”

Northeastern Baseball Falls to Wake Forest in Season Opener

By Jordan Baron

These days, it’s pretty routine to find a baseball team at the AA level or higher where a majority of the pitching staff can throw 95 or higher. What’s abnormal is when a college team has that.

But that’s exactly what the Northeastern Huskies faced in their Friday night season opener, as they squared off on the road against the No. 17 Wake Forest Demon Deacons and their 11 flamethrowers. And, to everyone’s surprise, the unranked Huskies put up quite the fight against their ACC opponent. They fought back from an early deficit to take the lead in the middle innings before a three-run bomb and some good relief work gave the Deacons an 8–6 win.

“Pretty fun college baseball game and thought it was pretty well played by both teams,” Northeastern head coach Mike Glavine said. “Not the result that we wanted, but certainly a really good battle.”

Northeastern redshirt senior starter Kyle Murphy went five innings and gave up five earned runs across that span, four of which came in the first. The Huskies outhit the Deacons 12 to six but couldn’t convert the hits into runs, as they left eight men on base.

Murphy did not begin his season the way would’ve liked to, hitting the first batter he faced before giving up a double and a walk to load the bases. Junior catcher Shane Muntz punished the right-hander with a bomb of a grand slam to put the Deacons up by four.

Murphy settled in after that, and pitched extremely well for four innings, giving up just one more run and retiring the last six batters he faced. Murphy, whose K/9 sat at around 12.5 during last-year’s pandemic shortened season, fanned seven batters in his five innings.

“He’s a veteran, but even still for him it’s [the] first inning, it’s outside, it’s another team, and just kind of settling in. Once he got through that first inning . . . he pitched really well,” Glavine said.

The Husky offense faced the mighty arm of sophomore firebender Ryan Cusick, whose fastball topped out at nearly 100 mph on the evening. The #40 ranked prospect in college baseball lived up to his reputation; through five innings he had retired eight batters via the punchout and given up just three hits.

“There’s less room for error,” Glavine noted. “Obviously you can’t get down when you strike out or feel like you’re not grinding. And you got to find ways to lengthen at bats, make them work a little bit, try to drive up pitch counts and then wait for mistakes. You’ve got to be ready for them.”

Cusick had all the confidence coming out for the sixth, and with a 5–0 deficit against a nationally ranked team, the Huskies were in a very tough spot.

Suddenly, however, Northeastern caught up to Cusick’s fastball, as redshirt sophomore Ben Malgeri doubled to lead off the inning and advanced to third on a groundout to get himself 90 feet from scoring the Huskies’ first run. Redshirt junior Ian Fair used his power to muscle a fly ball to deep center for an easy sacrifice fly.

With two outs, the scoring threat looked to be neutralized, but the resilient Huskies slapped two straight singles to give redshirt sophomore Corey DiLoreto an opportunity for more damage. The first baseman took it and smacked a laser beam down the left field line that barely bounced in fair territory for a double, scoring both runs and bringing the Huskies within two. Cusick completed the inning, but his pitch count was too high to go any further.

“Strikeouts can add up,” Glavine said. “Even though they stink as far as not putting balls in play, if you force him to throw four, five, six pitches to punch you out, you hope that helps out later.”

Northeastern kept the ball rolling in the seventh and eighth against the Wake Forest bullpen, striking for one in the former and two in the latter to take a 6–5 lead. Redshirt sophomore Owen Langan pitched two innings of scoreless relief in the home half of the sixth and seventh, striking out two Deacons and not allowing a hit.

Entering the late innings, the Huskies looked poised to take a victory in their season opener. However, Deacon freshman Brock Wilken had other ideas, as he rocketed a ball down the left field line and over the fence for a three-run homer off redshirt junior reliever Brandon Dufault. The Deacons finished with a 1-2-3 ninth and snatched the victory.

“We’ll just regroup tonight,” Glavine said. “Tomorrow [we’ll] see how the guys feel and try to get some other guys in there . . . I think they got a couple freshmen arms in there tonight which is something they probably want to do and same for us, trying to get different arms in.”

The Huskies will send sophomore Sebastian Keane to the hill tomorrow to face junior William Fleming.