Dogs Over Cats

By Sarah Olender

BOSTON — Going into Friday night’s game, with New Hampshire stalling near the bottom of the Hockey East standings and Northeastern hovering in third, it was natural to expect a blowout. The reality was far closer.

“I thought at times out execution was good,” Northeastern Acting Head Coach Nick Carpenito said. “I thought at times our execution was not so good and I think that’s just going to come with playing more.”

By the end of the first period, the Wildcats were outshooting the Huskies 14–6, not what anyone expected from a conference cellar dweller playing against a strong Husky defense. But one of the six Husky shots was a gorgeous strike from Katie Cipra, who wove between the Wildcat defenders and effortlessly found the top right corner of the net for the Huskies first opening-period goal of the season.

“She’s got [some] of the best hands I’ve seen in a long time,” Carpenito said. “She makes it look effortless. If you give that kid a little bit of space, she’s going to make you pay. To have somebody with that talent on the fourth line, I think it speaks so much to our depth and why we’re so successful.”

Katy Knoll kept things rolling to start the second period, tipping a shot from defender Megan Carter past Wildcat goaltender Ava Boutilier. In an TV interview after the period ended, Knoll noted that she and Carter — who is her roommate — practiced this shot before the game. It was rewarding, she said, to see their practice pay off. 

However, the celebration was short lived. Brianna Brooks quickly answered, freezing Husky defender Lily Yovetich in a two-on-one and firing an unobstructed shot past goalie Aerin Frankel.

“It was definitely a little bit of an unfortunate bounce,” Frankel commented. “I think I made the stop and the puck actually bounced up and went behind me. I feel like there’s some tough bounces that we’re going to run into and it happens and that’s just hockey.”

The goal was the first Frankel allowed in nearly a month, as she recorded shutouts in the only two games Northeastern played during that span. Just four days after breaking the program’s career shutout record, Frankel nabbed another piece of Husky history.

In the third period, Northeastern’s Ani FitzGerald drew a five-minute major and game misconduct penalty from Nicole Kelly when the Wildcats’ star freshman forward contacted FitzGerald’s head. During this power play, the Huskies fought hard and spent an overwhelming amount of time in the offensive zone, yet could not find the back of the net. Within the first 13 minutes of the period, they had 19 shots on goal, as many as they’d had in the first two periods combined.

FitzGerald, shaken up from the hit, sat for a shift, with Knoll replacing her on the first line. When FitzGerald returned, she was tagged with her own penalty for goalie interference. With about 90 seconds to go, the Huskies had no choice but to bring out their lethal penalty kill lineup of Alina Mueller, Chloe Aurard, Brooke Hobson, and Skylar Fontaine. New Hampshire compounded the pressure by pulling Boutilier, leaving Northeastern to rebuff a four-on-six in their own defensive zone. 

“Whenever we’re protecting the lead, typically we got that lead because we were aggressive and we were taking away space and we were putting on pretty solid pressure,” Carpenito said. “So we didn’t really change up our penalty kill philosophy too much.”

Good call. With 30 seconds to play, Hobson fired the puck out of the zone. As it caromed off the pipe of New Hampshire’s goal, Tessa Ward got there first and slotted home an empty netter to yield the 3–1 final score.

The Huskies (4–1–0) will rematch the Wildcats (3–8–0) tomorrow in New Hampshire at 6 PM Eastern. Jack Sinclair and George Barker will call the game, with coverage beginning about 10 minutes before puck drop.

Women’s Hockey Falls to BC, 2–1

By Catherine Morrison and Milton Posner

BOSTON — As the Northeastern women’s hockey team trudged to the locker room, passing through the walkway lined with cardboard cutouts of Husky fans and a few curious cardboard dogs, the question was “how.”

Not necessarily how the game was lost, but how did Boston College score two goals in such bizarre fashion? How did Hanna Bilka fire a puck parallel to the goal line into a trio of Huskies and somehow find the back of the net?

How did Aerin Frankel, arguably the best goaltender in the country, let Jillian Fey, who scored just two goals last season, beat her for the second time in two games?

“She went out to play the puck and their kid came up from behind her, she didn’t see it and she didn’t see their player,” Northeastern Head Coach Dave Flint explained. “She jarred the puck loose, and then just got it and wrapped it in. We need to just be better on communication, the D needs to communicate with her. She needs to understand too, that if there is a lot of pressure back there just to dump that puck into space. It’s a learning lesson for everybody, and that’s the first time I can recall that’s happened to us in a long time. So it’s just an unfortunate miscue.”

BC (5–3–0, 5–1–0 WHEA) had already played seven games this season, and Northeastern (1–1–0 HEA) only one. That kind of difference, especially given the team’s November delays due to COVID-19 protocol, make finding a rhythm difficult.

“We had two and a half weeks where we didn’t touch the ice when we got shut down and then we [had] five days to get ready for BC,” he said. “I don’t think we had our game legs either today. Game shape is different from practice, you’ve got to play games to get those legs, so the tough part is when you’re having these weird stretches of game, no game.”

This is not to say that the Huskies didn’t display any fire. They managed to tie the game a few minutes before Fey’s goal, with Katy Knoll slotting home a loose puck off a blocked Peyton Anderson shot.

Knoll, with one of the only bright spots of the game, has had an electric start to the year with two goals in two games after notching just 10 goals total last season. The sophomore will certainly be one to watch as she takes on more responsibility.

Her goal came after sustained pressure in the Eagles’ zone, something Northeastern had a hard time doing in stretches. And when they did, BC netminder Abigail Levy stood tall, stifling or redirecting 34 shots on the evening.

“She’s a big goalie, takes up a lot of net,” Flint noted. “We didn’t make it difficult for her the first two periods. She was seeing all the shots and we weren’t jumping on rebounds, but the third period she came up with some big saves for them and helped secure the win.”

The Fey slip-up notwithstanding, Frankel played a strong game, as BC peppered her with a number of strikes from in close.

“She played great,” Flint said. “We were just sloppy on our own end, and usually that’s one of our strong suits, so we need to be better. Aerin kept us in it the whole time, and that’s what she usually does. We just need to get better, and this week we’ll work on some D-zone, and we have some good video from today’s game that we’ll break down on Tuesday.”

The Huskies’ next game is a New Year’s Day road tilt against Connecticut, though Flint acknowledged that the team is looking for games for this upcoming week.

Northeastern Women’s Hockey Bests BC to Kick Off Season

By Mike Puzzanghera

CHESTNUT HILL, MA — It took Northeastern about a period and a half to shake off the rust, but the Huskies are back and rolling as they scored three times in the third period to beat Boston College, 4–1.

Northeastern (1–0) faced the tough task of opening their season on the road against the ninth-ranked team in the country, the BC Eagles (4–3). With BC coming off a weekend sweep of UConn and playing some good hockey, Northeastern was thrown into the deep end in game one.

Things didn’t start well for the Huskies — they made some sloppy passes in the opening frame and gifted BC some chances, which they eventually took advantage of. BC’s Jillian Fey scored her third goal of the season 18 minutes in with a shot from the point. Off the replay, it looked like the shot deflected off NU captain Brooke Hobson in front of the net to beat Aerin Frankel in goal.

The Huskies got their goal in the second, though. After absorbing BC pressure in their own zone for almost five minutes, Northeastern hit back on the rush. Megan Carter grabbed a loose puck and fired a rocket of a pass to Katy Knoll to release the break. Knoll went forward down the left and played a pass across to Andrea Renner in between the circles. Renner, after missing a few chances early, didn’t miss again, and went five-hole on BC goalie Maddy McArthur for her first goal in over a year.

Renner missed all of last season with an injury, and her goal highlighted a great all-around game in her return. It was her first goal since the Hockey East championship game in 2019, also against BC.

Northeastern started the third period on the kill, but maintained offensive pressure throughout BC’s power play and added momentum through the period. They finally took their first lead of the season six minutes in, as Knoll scored a miraculous backhanded goal off a great feed from freshman Lily Yovetich. Yovetich found Knoll cutting in between the circles and the sophomore grabbed the puck and flicked it past McArthur for her second point of the game.

The fourth line added the Huskies’ third goal, as they capped a great game as a unit with a goal from Kate Holmes. Micaela Sindoris and Katie Cipra won the puck behind McArthur’s net, and Cipra managed to slide the puck out to Holmes, who was parked in front of the net. Holmes generated an insane amount of power from only a few feet out, leaving McArthur with no chance at a save and putting NU up 3–1.

A minute and a half later, the reigning Hockey East Player of the Year made her presence felt. Alina Mueller took a pass, beat two defenders, and sniped the bottom right corner of the net, beating McArthur glove-side (where she had made plenty of big saves all game) and capping the scoring for Northeastern.

“It feels great that we got on the ice and the girls got to play a game,” Northeastern Head Coach Dave Flint said. “The victory was just the icing on the cake.”

It was a strong all-around performance. Renner was incredible on offense, creating multiple chances with powerful shots to test McArthur and logging a goal to go cap it off (though she’ll probably want a scuffed shot on a first-period power play back). Frankel made 25 saves in net, including some tough ones against reigning National Rookie of the Year Hannah Bilka. And Hobson was as sure-handed as ever captaining the side and leading the defensive unit. But Flint was quick to point out some errors the team made, particularly early on.

“There were too many turnovers, we weren’t moving the puck quick enough,” Flint said. “When you haven’t played a game in that long, it’s different than practice.”

The Huskies will be at home next time out against the same BC unit, facing off at Matthews Arena on Sunday. Milton Posner and Catherine Morrison will broadcast that game, with coverage beginning at 4:45 PM Eastern.

Mueller Named Player of the Year, Huskies Dominate WHEA Awards

By Matt Neiser

Surprise, surprise.

Well, not really.

In the midst of one of the greatest season in programs history, nine players on the No. 4 Northeastern women’s hockey team and head coach Dave Flint were honored with a slew of awards for the 2019–20 campaign, the conference announced this week.

Freshmen Megan Carter and Katy Knoll, sophomores Alina Mueller and Chloe Aurard, juniors Skylar Fontaine and Aerin Frankel, seniors Matti Hartman and Paige Capistran, and head coach Flint were all recipients of various conference awards, as voted on by the league’s 10 head coaches.

Headlining the honors were Mueller and Flint, who took home two of the most prestigious awards on Friday.

Mueller was unanimously selected the Cammi Granato Award winner as the Player of the Year in Hockey East. With 20 goals and 24 assists for 44 points in Hockey East play, Mueller led the conference in scoring by a wide margin; the next closest player (teammate Chloe Aurard) was 10 points behind. Mueller led the conference in both points and assists as well, in addition to her nine game-winning goals and three shorthanded goals. If ever there was a time for a unanimous selection, Mueller’s season fits the bill.

Mueller also earned a pair of statistical awards during her otherworldly regular season. The sophomore was named both the league’s Scoring Champion and the PNC Bank Three Stars Award winner.

After every Hockey East contest, the Three Stars of the game are announced. The Three Stars Award is given to the player that accumulates the most “points” based on these recognitions, with first being worth the most points and third the least. Mueller was named the first and second star four times apiece and the third star on a trio of occasions, earning her the overall award.

For the second year in a row, Flint was voted as the Coach of Year. Northeastern’s helmsman led the Huskies to a program-record 24 conference wins and their second consecutive regular season title. Flint’s never-too-high, never-too-low mentality has been a staple of his teams’ success over the years and helped the Huskies to new heights this year.

Mueller (unanimous), Aurard, Fontaine (unanimous), and Frankel were each named First-Team All-Stars and collectively comprised two-thirds of the team’s selections. 

Second only to her linemate Mueller, Aurard racked up 34 points on 15 goals and 19 assists in Hockey East play. Individually, her goal and assist tallies rank third and second in the conference. Aurard was the only player in Hockey East to record two hat tricks, and she matched Mueller’s three shorthanded goals. Talk about a lethal duo on that top line.

Fontaine, Northeastern’s star blueliner, led Hockey East defensemen in myriad categories, including goals (13), assists (21), points (34), rating (+42) and shots on goal (155). Fontaine was a vital contributor to Northeastern’s elite offense and defense, often her blinding speed and smooth stickhandling to initiate attacks and stymie opponents’. 

Fontaine was also honored with the Best Defenseman Award. She is the first Northeastern player to win the award since its inception ten years ago.

Stalwart as ever in net, Frankel compiled one of the best seasons in Hockey East history. Her .967 save percentage is the highest mark in conference history, while her .84 goals against average ranks third. Frankel also led the conference with nine shutouts, as well as wins and win percentage (.864) with a 19–3–0 record in Hockey East play. A top-10 Patty Kazmaier candidate, Frankel consistently gives the Huskies a chance to win every game. The junior netminder was also named Goaltender of the Year for the second straight season.

Carter and Knoll, the most prominent members of the Huskies’ standout freshman class, were both named to the Pro Ambitions All-Rookie Team. 

Carter was a pivotal part of the conference-best Northeastern defense, her size and physicality perfectly complementing Fontaine’s speed and shiftiness. The blueliner led Hockey East freshmen with 41 blocked shots in the regular season, while chipping in two goals and nine assists.

Knoll made an immediate offensive impact for the Huskies. The Amherst, New York native oscillated between the first and second forward lines for most of the season, earning two Pro Ambitions Rookie of the Month nods (November, December) and a WCHA National Rookie of the Month award as she led Northeastern freshmen in scoring with 10 goals and 16 assists (26 points). Those numbers were good for fourth, second, and third among Hockey East first-years.

Matti Hartman, the Huskies’ second-line center, was named the conference’s Best Defensive Forward. Hartman excelled on the forecheck, pinning opposing teams in their own zone and regaining possession for the Huskies by forcing turnovers. When opponents actually made it down to the Northeastern end, her excellent positioning clogged passing lanes and disrupted attacks. Hartman is the third Husky to earn the honor, joining alumnae Casey Pickett and Hayley Scamurra.

Paige Capistran is the first-ever Northeastern recipient of the Sportsmanship Award. Voted by her teammates as captain for the first time in her final campaign, Capistran has been a Husky mainstay over the past four years and always exemplified leadership qualities on and off the ice.

A quick anecdote about Capistran to cap things off, as it’s one of my favorite stories and really illustrates what she’s meant to the program. In the waning seconds of regulation in last year’s Hockey East Championship, all hell broke loose. A waved-off empty netter, a thrown notebook, and a late Boston College faceoff goal to force overtime left the Huskies reeling as they headed back to their locker room to regroup.

Was it captain Brittany Bugalski that settled things down and rallied the troops? One of the assistant captains, maybe? According to Kasidy Anderson, it was actually Capistran, who up to that point was known by the media as more of a quiet presence than an outspoken leader. Anderson recalled that Capistran reminded everyone to forget about the chaos that had just happened, even though it “sucked,” and focus on the task ahead. It would have been easy to blame officials or lament bad luck, but the now-captain displayed true sportsmanship, shrugging it all off and getting her team back on track as they went on to claim the trophy.

The Huskies will look to return to the championship again this weekend, starting with their semifinal matchup against Maine at 12 p.m. today. WRBB will provide written coverage of the game.

Women’s Hockey Bests Providence, 4–1

By Jack Sinclair

The Huskies have planted themselves atop the Hockey East standings and brought the Beanpot home, but their goals hardly end there. As the third-ranked team in the nation with one of the best defenses in the nation, the best goalie in the nation, and one of the best forwards in the nation, the Huskies’ aspirations extend beyond the Beanpot and beyond Hockey East. Their campaign to an NCAA Frozen Four continued today, as the Huskies rematched the Providence Friars a day after the Friars handed the Huskies their first loss in 11 games.

Providence Forward Sara Hjalmarsson struck first, weaving her way through the Northeastern defense and slipping the puck past freshman goaltender Gwyn Phillips after a nifty move to get her out of position. 

The remainder of the first period saw Northeastern gain their footing on defense, and the beginning of their onslaught of shots on Providence goalie Sandra Abstreiter. Before the period ended, they fired nine shots on net to swing the momentum their way.

The start of the second period saw the puck spend a considerable amount of time on the Providence end of the ice. The Friars generated a couple of transition chances through the neutral zone, but the Huskies made sure that they couldn’t establish themselves on their end. Four minutes into the period, Skylar Fontaine slipped the puck to Alina Mueller on the edge of the crease and the nation’s second-leading scorer wasted no time, deking out the Friar netminder and scoring her 21st goal of the season.

Six minutes and one Husky power play later, Katy Knoll forced a turnover on the Providence end, took advantage of poor positioning on the part of the Providence pipe protector, and broke the tie.

The second period saw some good looks on goal for Providence, as the Huskies struggled to stop their transition offense through the neutral zone. But Phillips, along with the defenders in front of her, held fast, preserving the 2–1 lead.

The third period saw Providence dig deeper into their bag of tricks, as they worked into some three-on-two and two-on-one situations on offense, but Phillips made some huge stops to avoid a tie.

By this point, the NU offense was really rolling. The puck snapped from stick to stick and cycled up and down the rink, and the Friars could not get the puck out of their end. Five minutes into the period, Lauren MacInnis, the double-overtime hero from the Huskies’ Beanpot win, found herself with a good look at the Providence goal. Mia Brown screened the Providence netminder well, blocking her view of the puck, and MacInnis sniped the top right corner from the edge of the left circle, putting Northeastern up, 3–1. 

The third period rolled on, with Providence getting a few more chances to score — mainly because Northeastern head coach Dave Flint gave ice time to some younger players — but the Huskies held their lead. Providence pulled their goalie with just over three minutes to go in the period, desperate to spark their offense. Unlike the last time the Huskies defended a six-on-five, they did not allow a goal, and Katy Knoll broke through the neutral zone for her easiest goal of the season. 

Northeastern’s 4–1 win is their first against Providence this season after two losses. The Huskies will close their regular season with a home-and-home against Merrimack College before the Hockey East tournament the following week.

Women’s Hockey Falls to Providence on OT Winner

By Milton Posner and Rae Deer

BOSTON — Northeastern has dominated the entire season.

They’ve won 25 games, shut out their opponents for 315 consecutive minutes, and clinched the top spot in the Hockey East Standings in January.

But there’s one team in Hockey East that doesn’t seem scared of the Huskies, and on Friday night they stormed into Matthews Arena and emerged victorious. For the second time this season, the Providence Friars bested the Northeastern Huskies, as the Huskies followed their dramatic double-overtime Beanpot win with a 2–1 overtime loss.

Almost right away, it seemed like the game would follow a different story, that the momentum from Tuesday night’s victory would carry over. Less than a minute into the game, after an early Husky line change, freshman forward Katy Knoll received the puck in the neutral zone, crossed over, and carried the puck to the doorstep. After her first shot was deflected, Knoll slapped the rebound past Friar goaltender Sandra Abstreiter to kick off the scoring.

Nearly two full periods would pass before another puck found the back of the net. The intervening time saw both teams push the pace in an attempt to put pressure on the other’s defense, with a number of long-distance, rushed passes missing their targets. Both teams seemed to have trouble communicating, leading to frequent turnovers and preventing either squad from building momentum.

The turnovers and quick pace also decreased the quality of each team’s shots. Neither Abstreiter nor Husky goalie Aerin Frankel dealt with many dangerous shots in the first two periods. Other than Skylar Fontaine faking Hayley Lunny back to Providence, Northeastern’s offense didn’t get much going after Knoll’s score.

“We had some good looks, but they did a good job keeping us outside and they blocked a lot of shots and weren’t letting us get inside,” Northeastern head coach Dave Flint observed. “I think Alina [Mueller] got robbed twice in tight, but other than that we didn’t have a ton of good looks at the net. A lot of them were perimeter shots outside. It was the same thing when we lost 1–0 there earlier in the year.”

In the second period, the activity become aggression. After just one penalty in the opening frame, the teams drew four in the second. Though Avery Fransoo and Brooke Hobson’s offsetting roughing penalties fizzled without a goal, the Huskies wouldn’t be so lucky after Knoll’s hitting from behind penalty with about four minutes to play. Providence defender Lauren DeBlois waited all of four seconds to make Northeastern pay, curving toward the middle and slinging the puck by Frankel.

Once in the second period and once in third, the Huskies had goals ripped from their grasp. Mueller and Matti Hartman both scored to give the Huskies the lead, but each goal was snatched away after official reviews confirmed an offsides entry.

Catalyzed by another five penalties, both teams fired 14 shots on goal in the third, easily the most of any period. Abstreiter and Frankel withstood the test, and the Huskies headed to overtime for the second time this week.

But a Megan Carter holding penalty would soon spell doom for the Huskies. Halfway through the power play, assisted by the same two teammates who aided her first goal, DeBlois fired one past Frankel to end the night. Providence had punctured Northeastern’s elite penalty kill for the second time.

“Our PK has been great all year, but our complete level wasn’t where it needed to be,” Flint said. “We’ve got to stop taking penalties late in games. It finally came back and bit us in the butt.”

The win dropped Northeastern to 25–4–2 (21–3–0 HEAW). Though the standings mean little to them now that they’ve clinched, Flint admits that the game held another importance.

“This is a setback,” he admitted, “but a loss is OK because it brings them back down to reality a little bit like, ‘Hey, we can lose; anyone can beat us.’ So hopefully that’s a little wakeup call for us and we’ll be better down the stretch.”

Women’s Hockey Clinches Second Straight Regular Season Championship

By Catherine Morrison

BOSTON — Every major women’s hockey poll places Boston University as the eighth-best team in the nation. Although those polls place Northeastern third, the Huskies would be forgiven for taking every last game to edge BU out for the Hockey East crown.

The Huskies didn’t need that many. They clinched on Friday. On the last day of January. With three weeks to go.

Friday afternoon’s bout against the UConn Huskies started in Northeastern’s usual style: a first-period goal. Chloe Aurard passed to Alina Mueller dead in front of the goal for an easy score, Northeastern 43rd opening-period goal this season.

Katy Knoll looked to add her own goal but was blocked by UConn forward Catherine Crawley. At the fifteen minute mark, Matti Hartman went into the penalty box for hooking, giving UConn a chance to even the score. But twenty five seconds later, a UConn tripping penalty evened the numbers. Neither team capitalized, and the four-on-four ended without incident.

Five minutes later, Northeastern’s Aerin Frankel made a great glove save, snatching Brianna Colangelo’s shot out of the air. Shortly after, Mueller would-be second goal clanged off the pipe. With two minutes left in the period, UConn’s Danielle Fox found some empty net and shot the puck in, tying the score. UConn nearly took the lead, but Frankel turned away Viki Harkness and Camryn Wong.

The second period began with a bang when, after just twenty-four seconds, Mueller snapped a shot off from the left circle for her second goal of the game and her eighteenth of the year.

Crawley looked to even the score but Frankel, determined not to cede the lead again, dove in front of the goal, practically belly flopping on the ice to block the shot.

After the early action, the second period became a fast-paced puck battle, with 21 combined shots on goal. Midway through, Northeastern’s Katie Cipra broke away and streaked towards the goal, but was blocked by UConn goalie Morgan Fisher. UConn got their own chance to score during a power play, but Colangelo’s shot deflected off the outstretched arm of Frankel and over the net.

Five minutes into the third period, Northeastern came at Fisher with a flurry of shots, first by Veronika Pettey, then by Knoll; both were dismissed. Lauren MacInnis then got control of the puck and tried for a goal but was wide. Katie Holmes put her foot in the ring, but was again blocked by Fisher. One minutes, five shots, nothing to show.

With seven minutes left in the game, Aurard tried from the left pipe, but Fisher snagged the puck in midair. Mueller tried for a hat trick with a missile from center ice but was stymied again by Fisher.

After a Megan Carter holding penalty, UConn pull Fisher to create a six-on-four. It looked like Frankel would handle it until Jessie Aney’s first collegiate goal tied the score. Northeastern tried to get back on top with shots by Matti Hartman, Mia Brown, and Holmes in the last seconds of the game, but the game went to overtime.

Both teams were desperate to end the game. Despite some great saves from Frankel, it appeared as though UConn would control the puck throughout the extra period.

But then the Huskies broke away. Codie Cross went for the game-winning goal, but was blocked by Wong. Aurard and Mueller tried, but were blocked by Fisher. It seemed like all hope was lost until Cross grabbed onto the puck and fired it in, sealing Northeastern’s eighth straight win. Mueller’s assist on the play marked her 100th collegiate point in just sixty games.

Northeastern (23–3–1, 20–2–0 HEAW) will take on No. 8 BU in the first round of the Beanpot on Tuesday. Dale Desantis, Alex Bensley, and Catherine Morrison will call that one, with coverage beginning at 4:45 PM EST.

Women’s Hockey Tops No. 8 BU

By Catherine Morrison

BOSTON — Northeastern’s Tuesday game against rival Boston University was a nail-biter from start to finish. BU started out strong with a first-period goal from Deziray De Sousa.

Northeastern is rarely behind at all, much less in the opening frame, and leads the nation with 42 first-period goals this season. However, the Huskies seemed off their game in the first, perhaps due to Chloe Aurard — the conference’s second-leading scorer with 17 goals — hitting the goalpost and hurting her wrist. (Aurard continued to play.)

In the second period the Huskies returned to form. Four minutes in, Northeastern goalie Aerin Frankel was called for tripping after she stuck her stick out. Gill Foote served the penalty, and a power play began for BU. However, luck wasn’t on the Terriers’ side as Alina Mueller broke away after getting the puck from Mia Brown and tied the game with a shorthanded goal.

Five minutes later, Veronika Pettey was called for hooking, giving BU a chance to pull ahead. Northeastern’s penalty kill was ready, and quickly took control of the puck. Mueller looked like she was going to score her second goal of the night, but was blocked by goaltender Corinne Schroeder. Matti Hartman took the rebound and looked like she might get the puck in, but it was blocked yet again. In an astounding move, defenseman Skylar Fontaine got the rebound and fired it in to give Northeastern the lead.

During the third period the Huskies were aggressive, blocking shots and checking players. Multiple BU players fell to the ice as the two teams battled for the puck, with each team getting just nine shots. With a few minutes remaining, Northeastern’s Katy Knoll earned a five-minute major penalty and, upon review, a ten-minute game misconduct after her body check from behind sent a BU player into the wall. Both players, albeit for different reasons, left the rink. Northeastern spent the rest of the game on the penalty kill and responded beautifully, ending the game at 2–1.

Northeastern’s penalty kill unit is one of the strongest in the nation. Their aggressive strategy of pursuing and controlling the puck quickly has earned them more shorthanded goals (six) than power-play goals (five) this season.

“It’s nice we can destroy their power play,” Mueller said.

Fontaine added, “Once we got that first one, with the PK, we got the momentum going and kept going and we ended up getting a second.”

Northeastern will look to extend their seven-game winning on Friday at home against the University of Connecticut.

Women’s Hockey Very Vehemently Vanquishes Vermont

By Catherine Morrison

Fifteen minutes into Saturday afternoon’s matchup with the Vermont Catamounts, Northeastern allowed a goal, the first in nearly three weeks. The team had played 315 consecutive minutes (more than five games) without letting their opponents on the board.

But in a reminder of the just how special this season has been, even a moment of disappointment was surrounded by overwhelming dominance. The Huskies thrashed Vermont, 10–2, for their sixth straight win.

They didn’t take long to get going, with Katy Knoll converting on a backhand just 36 seconds into the first period.

Five minutes later Chloe Aurard got in on the fun, taking advantage of a neat pass by Jess Schryver just in front of the goal to knock in the puck.

The Catamounts had an opportunity to shorten the Huskies’ lead when Tessa Ward went into the penalty box for cross checking. Although Vermont got a few good shots in, they couldn’t get past the indestructible Aerin Frankel.

With just 23 seconds left in the power play, Vermont was given a second chance when Skylar Fontaine was called for high sticking, making it five-on-three. Northeastern controlled the puck throughout the power play and much of the rest of the period. However, with five minutes to go, Vermont’s Val Caldwell shot from the right circle and ended the five-game shutout streak.

Northeastern rebounded four minutes into the second period when Lauren MacInnes put one home in from the right circle on a Veronika Pettey assist.

Vermont replaced goaltender Blanka Škodová with Natalie Ferenc in the hope of turning things around. The Catamounts were quickly given an opportunity to close the gap when Kristina Shanahan made a great shot at the goal, but Frankel turned her away.

Four minutes in, the Huskies capitalized on a Vermont penalty for too many players on the ice when Matti Hartman fired home a power-play goal from the left circle.

Apparently unsatisfied with one power-play goal, the Huskies made Vermont pay for a hooking penalty when Aurard notched her second goal of the game.

Vermont called a timeout, trying to regain control of a game that was quickly slipping away. The timeout appeared to do some good, as a few minutes later Shanahan’s ninth goal of the year cut the Husky lead to 5–2. But the Catamounts couldn’t celebrate for long, as Northeastern scored its third power play goal of the game when Schryver beat Ferenc for her third goal of the season.

With a little over eight minutes left in the second period, Aurard collected a rebound in front of the goal and netted her second hat trick of the season.

Clearly, the Huskies were not happy about the Catamounts taking away their shutout streak. With three minutes left, Peyton Anderson passed to Katie Cipra who knocked it in the back of the net, making the score 8–2 and ending an absolutely bonkers second period.

For the third period, coach Dave Flint replaced Frankel with freshman goaltender Gwyneth Philips, who hadn’t allowed a goal in 184 minutes of collegiate action. With a six-point lead, Flint must’ve felt comfortable giving Philips a little more playing time. Vermont also decided to change goalies, giving third-stringer Sierra Natzke her third career appearance.

Natzke faired about as well as expected, giving up a between-the-legs goal to Alina Mueller four minutes in.

Two minutes later, Northeastern captain Peyton Anderson snapped one home, producing the 10–2 final score.

The Huskies moved to 21–3–1 (18–2–0 HEAW), hold a nine-point lead atop the Hockey East standings, and will look to widen the margin on Tuesday against second-place BU. Christian Skroce, Matt Neiser, and Catherine Morrison will have the call, with coverage beginning at 6:45 PM EST.

Women’s Hockey Shuts out Boston College for Second Straight Game

By Matt Neiser

BOSTON — Boston College and Northeastern. Cross-town rivals. The top two teams in Women’s Hockey East. Any time these two squads face off, it’s must-watch action.

That said, there’s been a sizeable gap between the teams this season. Entering Sunday afternoon’s duel at Matthews Arena, the No. 3 Huskies had outscored the Eagles a combined 9–0 over two shutout wins on Boston College’s home turf. Northeastern already carried a five-point lead in the standings over BC — with two games in hand at that.

The Huskies’ dominance of the rivalry series continued into round three. The Eagles had no answer for the home team, falling 3–0 to Northeastern as the Huskies capped off a statement regular season sweep of Boston College.

“The goals didn’t come as easily as Friday,” head coach Dave Flint said. “It was a tough game. I like how we ground it out and battled for three periods.”

It took less than two minutes for Northeastern (17–3–1, 14–2–0 WHEA) to jump out in front. Matti Hartman took the puck into the slot on a counterattack and fired a wrister over the shoulder of Boston College (11–9–2, 10–7–1 WHEA) goaltender Kelly Pickreign for her fifth goal and 10th point of the season.

The Eagles had plenty of chances to respond in the first. The Huskies were called for three penalties, but stifled Boston College’s ensuing power plays. Shifting bodies in shooting lanes and constantly clearing pucks, they held the Eagles to three shots on net on those opportunities.

Northeastern killed off a fourth consecutive penalty halfway through the second frame before the whistles started blowing the other way. Boston College was called for four penalties over the final 11 minutes of the period, but Northeastern failed to convert. A defensive lapse even allowed the Eagles a clean shorthanded breakaway, but goaltender Aerin Frankel stonewalled Delaney Belinskas on the shot to bail out the Huskies.

The final penalty of the second period bled 17 seconds over to the third. Northeastern needed just 10 of those seconds to double their lead. Alina Mueller skated to the left side of the zone after winning the faceoff at center ice and received a pass from Skylar Fontaine. The Swiss sensation then did what she does best, threading the needle through three Boston College defensemen to find an open Katy Knoll on the weak side. The freshman tucked home her sixth goal of the season, extending the Huskies’ lead to 2–0.

After Boston College was called for yet another penalty three minutes later, Northeastern went on the power play again. Just like the one before it, this one ended with a puck in the back of the Eagles’ net. This time the culprit was Fontaine, who slotted home her ninth tally of the season off a feed from Chloe Aurard to put the game out of reach at 3–0. The Huskies held course the rest of the way, killing off one last penalty for good measure as time ran out.

The story of the game was the Northeastern penalty kill, which was a perfect five-for-five. The Huskies have allowed just five goals all season on the penalty kill in 64 opponent opportunities (7.8 percent).

Fontaine, a key part of the four-on-five, lit up when asked about the PK unit’s performance: “It makes us really proud. We put a lot of work in in practice for PKs, so it’s great to see it turn out on the ice.”

“Our PK forecheck is really good; they execute it to a tee every time,” said Flint. “We apply pressure when we need to apply pressure, and it’s tough for teams to get anything going against us. We’ve got kids out there willing to block shots, and your best penalty killer needs to be your goalie — and [Frankel’s] a pretty good penalty killer.”

Frankel added, “I can confidently say the entire year our penalty kill has been really strong, so that’s really nice to see and it’s helpful to our game.”

Frankel’s play against the Eagles this season has been historically dominant. No team has ever shut out BC three times in one season, and Frankel has blanked the Eagles more times this season than every other NCAA goalie in the last five years combined. She followed up her 26-save performance on Friday with 25 saves on Sunday, and recorded her sixth shutout of the season.

“I think it’s really big for the program in general,” Frankel said of the team’s dominance over BC. “Over the past decade it’s always been a really intense rivalry, but I think over the past couple years we’ve had the upper hand on them . . . I think it says a lot about how far this program’s come and I’m really proud of this team.”

Northeastern resumes play on Friday when Hockey East foe UConn visits Matthews Arena for a 6 PM matchup.